Print Server

Video Activity
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Time
21 hours 25 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
21
Video Transcription
00:00
>> Hello, Cybrarians.
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>> Welcome back to
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>> the Linux+ course here at Cybrary.
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I'm your instructor Rob Goelz,
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and in today's lesson, we're going to
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be covering Print Servers.
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Upon completion of this lesson,
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you are all going to be able to talk about why
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organizations still need printers
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and still use print servers,
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and we're going to talk a little bit about
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how print servers work in Linux.
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Most organizations have a structure where
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it's a lot more cost effective
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to share a single network printer,
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or a couple of network printers,
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than to provide a printer to each and every user.
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Then also, when you have this centralized setup,
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you can monitor the print jobs and track who's
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using all the darn printer paper in the office.
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Some organizations do still print copies of data,
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some places produce material,
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produce papers and magazines, and so therefore,
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it's important to them to have
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that centralized management,
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and inside into what's going on with their printing.
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But print servers are a bit of a misnomer as well.
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A lot of printers have a built-in print server
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to handle sharing the printer,
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and they may also have a web interface
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for management of the printer.
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But when we're talking about printing in Linux,
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the print sharing package in Linux is called the
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Common Unix Printing System,
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or CUPS for short.
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CUPS allows a Linux system to connect to any printer,
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that can be locally or over the network.
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Now, when connecting to a local printer,
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Linux requires you to have drivers loaded,
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and some vendors do provide CUPS drivers for Linux,
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so that's what you're going to want to look out for.
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If you're trying to get a printer that works with Linux,
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make sure they are CUPS drivers
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available from the vendor,
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and when connecting to a network printer though,
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CUPS uses the Internet Printing Protocol or IPP.
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In some cases, Linux may also use Samba to
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connect the printers if they are
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shared on Windows systems.
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A server that's running CUPS can
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act also as a central print server,
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and it can mediate access to the printers
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that are connected to that server locally.
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If you have this set up,
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the configuration file for CUPS is etc/cups/cupsd.conf,
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and CUPS operates on port 631 by default.
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Now, CUPS handles any jobs to a print queue,
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just as we would expect any print server to do,
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but it also takes care of
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some other basic printing needs,
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such as canceling print jobs,
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and giving different print jobs more priority.
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But with that, we reached into this lesson.
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In this lesson, we covered why
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some businesses are still
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using printers and print servers,
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and then we talked about the Linux
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CUPS software of printing.
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Thanks so much for being here, and I look
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forward to seeing you in the next lesson.
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