IoT Communications Part 1

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Time
8 hours 10 minutes
Difficulty
Advanced
CEU/CPE
8
Video Transcription
00:00
Hi, I'm Matthew Clark, and this is less than 3.5 I o t communications Part one.
00:07
There are a lot of communication protocols when it comes to I O. T.
00:12
And over the next two lessons, we're going to discuss these 10 I ot communication protocols.
00:20
We'll focus on the bolted pink ones in part one and the white ones in Part two.
00:25
Now put these in a specific order. Let's see if you can figure out what that order is by the end of our second lesson,
00:33
and I have most likely left off your favorite protocol. So my apologies in advance.
00:39
Well, let's get started
00:42
when planning for communication within the i o T ecosystem. There are many things to consider, like frequency of transmission and range data rate application requirements,
00:55
existing communication protocols that may already be in use,
01:00
ease of use for the consumer, the cost involved or and, of course, security considerations.
01:07
And there are many different protocols communication types that can address all of these concerns.
01:14
So let's start our discussion with near field communications.
01:19
This is a low speed network protocol used to connect electronic devices at really small distances.
01:26
It uses a tag in a reader. The NFC tag could be either active or passive,
01:32
but the reader is always an active mode.
01:36
The NFC devices operate and half duplex mode, and so one device transmits while the other receives. Uh, this is also known as listen before talk.
01:46
It's used in contact with payment systems. It could be used in identity documents and key cards.
01:52
Bluetooth pairing for joining WiFi
01:55
Water metering appliance sights set up,
01:57
uh, the specs It operates at a frequency of 13.56 megahertz.
02:02
The range is 10 to 20 centimeters. Data rates could be as low as 106 or his highest 424 kilobytes per second.
02:13
So for each one of these will use smiles and frowns instead of pros and cons, because sometimes of something that it could be a smile can also be around. Um um, it's used in payment systems. That's the smile. It's generally more secure than credit card magnetic strips
02:29
on and can be used with the pin.
02:30
It takes advantage of mobile wallet, so Google and Apple mobile wallets that could be used with that
02:38
it doesn't require a search and pair procedure like Bluetooth. Um,
02:43
and there's no special software that's needed doesn't require Emmanuel configurations or settings. It's compatible with existing R F I D networks. Another great smiles. It requires less power than Bluetooth.
02:57
Um, so some of the frowns it's considered to be an expensive technology for large scale deployments.
03:04
And there are some security concerns, not necessarily with the protocol itself, but how the protocols used or in the applications that typically use the protocol, like thes wallets from Google or Apple.
03:17
And it's talking about the kind of the amount of data and the type of data that's stored on the device within those wallets and what happens when the device gets stolen. And again, not very big frowns in my book related to the protocol itself, because really, those air application issues,
03:35
um,
03:38
so let's talk about Bluetooth low energy.
03:40
Um, this is a wireless personal area network protocol. It's designed by the Bluetooth sig or the special interest group. It's used for a short range communication.
03:53
Bluetooth works in the 2.4 gigahertz pan and use frequency hopping
03:59
as a data rate of 1 to 2 megabits per second and a maximum range of about 20 m,
04:04
and that's for class to class. One could go up to 100 m, a serious battery implications. And, quite frankly, that's probably not gonna be used in I O T
04:14
devices.
04:15
So Bluetooth low energy is formally known as Blue. Too smart.
04:18
The use case is for compact battery operated applications like a fitness watch. You see this used a lot in the wearables market. Blood pressure monitors, fitness tracker smartwatches, wearable panic buttons, things like that. We can also see it in the industrial monitoring
04:39
sensors, which may need to run on batteries for longer periods of time, like months or even years.
04:45
Uh, you might see this also in public transportation, APS
04:48
and so smiles and frowns smiles here. It's really good low power communication protocol.
04:55
The radio itself has turned off a much as possible.
04:59
It's in small chunks of data at really low transfer speeds.
05:02
Bluetooth low energy is not really designed for file transfer. It's more suitable for small chunks of data.
05:10
There's a low cost to use this, the modules and chips or relatively inexpensive when compared to other similar technologies.
05:17
There's no cost to access the specifications. That's That's always a great thing. You don't have toe by a license or join the club in order to get the specs,
05:28
Um, and it's in use right now. This isn't something that just might take off one day. In fact, it's heavily used, making it a pretty good, pretty safe protocol choice if you had to choose one.
05:39
And so let's take a look at the frowns here. The frowns, our course data throughput. But that's also what makes it a smile When it comes to battery life.
05:46
Eso you have take the good with the bad.
05:49
The range here is 2.4 gigahertz. So when you're going through walls like wood versus break or metal water, all these three things that can affect the range
06:00
and the so can the antenna and the enclosure design that can impact range as well.
06:04
So even the way that you hold some really poorly designed I O. T devices like the devices orientation. If I held it here, there, it can impact range as well.
06:15
Eso the thing. One of the things with Gateway of Bluetooth low energy is that it requires the gateway. If you need to communicate out to the Internet, you're gonna have to convert that from a wireless, uh, personal area network protocol out to an Internet protocol.
06:39
Let's talk about Z Wave. Next. It's Ah, low power R F technology, mostly used in home automation products
06:47
like smart thermostats, lighting locks, sensors,
06:53
the targets. Reliable, low Leighton See communication. A small data packets. It's considered a secure protocol. It uses 128 bit A s symmetric encryption.
07:04
The specs on Z Wave
07:06
um, include frequency of about 900 megahertz. The range is about 30 m are 100 ft
07:15
Z wave documentation state 100 m or 328 ft in the open air on building materials they say will reduce that range. But since it's usually mostly used indoors, we're going to go with a lower range here
07:29
of about 30 m. Data rates that operates about 100 kilobits per second,
07:33
so smiles and frowns smiles. It's a standardized protocol. All devices speak the same language.
07:40
It helps with compatibility and communication between devices. It's scalable. Um, it can have high note counts. In fact, it can have 232 devices on bond but it could only use four hubs,
07:55
so it supports a full mesh without the need for a coordinator node, either. So frowns. Um, it's a premium technology at a premium price, so it's gonna cost to implement this.
08:07
You can't directly connect your phone to this because your phone doesn't have a Z wave antenna s, so it requires a smart hub, which increases three complexity of the overall solution.
08:18
It is battery intensive. It consumes more power compared to other similar products. Eso You may have to replace the battery more often, and it is considered a closed system, right?
08:30
Eso software patches can only be done by Zewe. For example.
08:37
Our last communication protocol will be WiFi. We're all pretty familiar with this one. It's a wireless land technology that's based on a 2 2011,
08:46
and it's a pretty common connectivity choices for lots of I O T devices with hardy infrastructures it doesn't require hubs and devices can connect directly to the Internet as quick data rates to take a look at the smiles and frowns. The smiles are quick data rates. It could handle large amounts of volume.
09:05
It's a range is about 30 m indoors and operates on the 2.4 and five gigahertz bands for frowns. If I does tend to consume except a lot of power
09:16
in this lesson, we discussed coyote communication protocols, including NSC, which is used mainly with payment systems. Bluetooth, Ellie or Low Energy
09:26
Z Wave, which is used mostly with home automation and WiFi.
09:31
I'll see you next time.
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