Time
6 hours 53 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
6

Video Transcription

00:02
Hello and welcome to Enterprise Project Management. Lesson nine. Business analysis and complex modeling.
00:11
This is really going to be the first lesson where we start to lose a lot of structure that's available to us in traditional
00:22
project management as well as traditional business process modeling.
00:26
So now what we've done is we've sort of made the leap from
00:32
complicated business processes or complicated processes in general
00:37
those that we can to find. And if you recall from the last video, we went ahead and built a sample process model of a Web store.
00:45
And now we've gone into
00:48
a much more
00:51
ah,
00:52
nebulous sort of business process, business challenge or opportunity that we're going to have to address in order to be successful at our enterprise project.
01:04
There's a lot less structure and specific guidance available in this era of complex business processes because
01:15
the infinite number of variables creates that issue.
01:19
So this really start to get into. I kind of joked in the last video about the big brain stuff.
01:23
Ah, this really gets into some more of the big brain stuff, and really, it's the cognitive framework and the cognitive processes that you need to uh, utilize in order to be successful at these types of projects.
01:40
Not to be totally Debbie Downer, but the
01:45
reality is, is that as we move
01:47
into a more digitized world, the projects, and especially the enterprise projects that you'll be faced with, are going to be more and more complex and unfortunately, less complicated.
02:00
So that requires a different way of thinking about things. So
02:07
when we run into complex problems and I briefly talked about in the last video, we're talking about problems such as, For example, how does the
02:20
flapping of a butterfly's wings
02:23
over the Plains in northern Texas impact the formation of hurricane in the Caribbean? So
02:32
I'm sure that I said that you like. It doesn't well, that's the thing is is we?
02:39
It has to be by virtue of the way the atmosphere works and weather works.
02:45
But there's just so much
02:47
subjectivity and variability between, said butterfly flapping their wings
02:53
and the formation in the path of hurricane. So
02:58
it's not that we don't understand the problem per se. It's that the problem is so complex that we simply can't visualize the the sheer number of variables and different past. Therefore, It makes it extremely difficult,
03:14
if not virtually impossible, to design a system, especially enterprise wide system
03:22
that can address a complex problem.
03:24
So what does that mean for us within strategy, realization and enterprise project management?
03:31
What that means, really is we no longer can rely on
03:38
are deliberate strategy, are deductive reasoning
03:42
are sort of top down.
03:45
You will do this because we need to do this type of thing or the ends versus the means we talked about also, You know that we're going to do this in order to do this In order to do that in order to be successful, win the war, whatever the case might be. So what we have to do?
04:00
It's actually changed the way of organizations behave and to become what is called a learning organization. So there's a couple of resource is here.
04:11
I was fortunate enough to actually be in Iraq
04:15
in 2000. I was fortunate, but who is in Iraq in 6 2007 and eight, when General Stanley McChrystal was there running the Joint Special Forces Task Force Special Operations Task Force,
04:28
uh, looking for Zarqawi anyway,
04:30
the book that he wrote called Team of teams is a great read and it it sort of reference of
04:39
how he was able to channel the ideas behind emergent strategy and learning organizations to tackle a problem which in this case was insurgent warfare that
04:54
seemed, and it is extraordinarily complex. So I don't want to ruin the whole book for you in case you decide to read it. But I will say that just for my own personal experience, the difference in
05:08
the
05:09
the results of that program from
05:12
when I got there, which was November of 2006 until February of 2008 when I left, was really a night and day difference. So it's a very successful counterinsurgency program that Crystal put in place. It was
05:29
very instrumental in reducing the amount of sectarian warfare and violence that occurred,
05:34
Um, and he does a really good job in that book of applying those processes and those cognitive frameworks to the modern business environment. So the great book to read.
05:46
Ah, then the article below that which you can you should be able to have a link full of this video to check out is from the Harvard Business Review, and it talks about
05:56
building a learning organization so
05:59
you can get additional details there. But basically, what I want to sort of focus on is
06:04
a learning organization is one that
06:11
gathers data,
06:13
understands the data, makes sense of the data,
06:15
generates a sort of hypothesis. And this is within the structure of an enterprise project
06:20
that
06:21
addresses that data
06:23
executes toward that goal in that vision.
06:27
But at the same time has processes to do
06:31
Ah, further data gathering, gathering, not focusing on assumptions or the idea that
06:40
we figured it all out in the beginning. But you're continually refining. Your process is, and the faster that you conduce that cycle, even within an enterprise project, the more successful you will be at complex problem, uh, modeling and complex problem solving.
06:56
So, uh, you think of in terms of, like, a golf game, right? You have a plan? I don't play golf, so I could be This may be a bad analogy, but you have a plan. You're gonna go and hit the ball and you're gonna halfway to
07:08
the whole. Then you're gonna, you know, get someone, someone you're gonna get next shot's gonna get out into the ER
07:15
the putting green, and then you're gonna put it in. So then you got your three shot part. Well,
07:20
if you assume that your plan is good, that you've made on your way to the golf course and then you start golfing and you don't change anything about your stroke the way you came, how hard you're hitting the ball, the type of club you're using, someone it's on. You can sort of imagine that you're
07:39
probably gonna have a difficult time because
07:42
you don't know all the variables that exist in that golf game before you get there, the wind could change. The weather could change the
07:50
the green and the fairway might be a different consistency than what you thought it was going to be. Your swing just maybe off for whatever reason. And so if you don't adjust to those things in near real time, you're not going to be successful at your game of golf. So that's sort of example
08:11
that hopefully is approachable for many of you, that
08:13
that learning organizations are ones that gather data and they develop a plan. But then, from the outset of executing that plan, they automatically start gathering more data and focusing on what are the things that we got right? The things that we got wrong, the adjustments that we need to make. And you have to
08:33
really
08:35
build a
08:35
a corporate culture in a structure that is designed to gather that data and make those corrections on the fly. So if you're a very paperwork S o. P. Intensive type of organization, you're gonna have a hard time transitioning to a learning organization, which is going to, unfortunately
08:54
cause you to struggle when trying to
08:58
do complex projects and complex problem modeling.

Up Next

Enterprise Project Management

In this Enterprise Project Management (EPM) training course, students will learn the fundamentals of managing projects at an enterprise level, including connecting previous project management knowledge to leadership’s vision and mission for the project.

Instructed By

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Kane Tomlin
Executive Consultant at FDOT, Professor
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