16.2 Case Studies Part 2

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Time
6 hours 23 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
6
Video Transcription
00:01
a little. Welcome back to Enterprise Project Management.
00:05
I am your instructor, cane,
00:07
And you will be going over the second case study
00:11
where,
00:13
in contrast to the first case study,
00:15
which was focused on sort of, ah challenges. And I wouldn't necessarily call it project failure, although it was very expensive,
00:23
Uh, a project that didn't go the way that the project team intended to a project that
00:30
went very, very well and one could argue, actually changed
00:35
the course of humanity.
00:37
And that project is the Apollo space program,
00:40
which today is called a program. When it was initially created,
00:45
it was viewed as a project. And if you recall from the earlier videos, a program is a series of
00:53
parallel
00:55
projects that support the overall program. So you can kind of think of it as a giant project.
01:02
Call the Apollo space program.
01:03
Um, again, if you look at the link here in the video and or click the link below the video
01:11
and go ahead and take
01:11
this one will be more like 30 to 40 minutes to review the Apollo space program. And then we will discuss the things some of the things
01:21
that made this program unique and highly successful in the era of enterprise project management.
01:36
All right, welcome back.
01:38
Hope you had a chance to read all of the details about the Apollo space program
01:44
and come up with your own conclusion of what the lessons learned were.
01:51
So one of the things that I personally found most interesting about the Apollo space program was that it was the origination of the Iron Triangle. So the idea that you can have
02:01
budget constraints, schedule constraints and performance criteria
02:07
and that
02:07
when one of them altars and alters the other two really originated from the Apollo space program. So something that we look at today as sort of project management doctor in one of the laws of project management. So on
02:23
really came about on Lee
02:25
50 plus years ago with the Apollo space program. And if you recall from the ER
02:31
founding doctrine of President Kennedy, you know is charged to NASA was that we're gonna send
02:39
a group of individuals to the moon and then return them home safely. So as a vision statement, that's very clear, concise,
02:46
but it doesn't really get into details about which one is the most important, least important and so on that really came about
02:54
via the various, uh,
02:58
organizational tension, various conflicts within the Apollo space program where you have individuals that was that were
03:07
spending a lot of time and energy influence in Congress and keeping the funding up there, while other groups were focused more on the technical aspects of actually accomplishing the mission that was given by the President.
03:21
So
03:22
again, one can argue. Since they invented the Iron Triangle, they clearly understood the driver and the weekend string, which in this case
03:30
is kind of difficult to really embrace.
03:31
Unless, like myself, you've been in the military, then you kind of have a better idea. The driver is, you know, the schedule,
03:39
the weak and strength is
03:42
the performance criteria in this case, bringing somebody back home from the moon alive
03:46
on that sounds kind of backwards because you think that human life is precious and there's no
03:53
no cost worth, uh,
03:55
paying in order to preserve human life. But
03:59
if you look at the actual mission statement and the focus of the Apollo space program, you'll realize that they did
04:08
make decisions
04:10
that were quote unquote detriment to human life, although
04:14
in hindsight they weren't and it was just slightly more risky.
04:17
But they made those decisions because they understood the driver, which was the schedule, and they knew that you know, the budget.
04:26
Although it wasn't the week constraint that the budget was more flexible than the driver being the schedule. And finally, when they're trying to make the decision of where to do
04:35
the lunar landing module docking and undocking from the main capsule, that kind of stuff
04:44
that they had to choose a route
04:46
that was,
04:47
um or, er,
04:50
expeditious from a time standpoint than to focus on
04:55
the human survivability or in this case, the weakened strength being the performance criteria
05:01
and had the whole thing going differently.
05:04
We might be looking at history differently, but it worked out. So by taking a little bit more risk
05:10
on the performance criteria, they were able to achieve their primary objective, which was to accomplish this goal within the decade of the 19 sixties.
05:20
They also did a very, very good job of managing plural of pluralism and mistrust.
05:27
So pluralism is the idea that you've got all these different organizations you had course massive being government organization. You had private organizations that were supporting NASA.
05:35
You had different divisions within NASA that were somewhat distrustful of each other. And they had a really, really good job of figuring out processes and procedures to manage that and really engage both the private sector and the public sector
05:53
in addition to
05:54
really bringing all of the different divisions within NASA into the same strategic mind set
06:00
and just
06:01
owning that goal and realizing that the goal was the most important thing for this project.
06:06
So you know, having
06:11
thousands and thousands of contractors making thousands and thousands of different parts with tolerance is in the microns.
06:18
And being able to bring all those things together and create a working spacecraft is really a testament to how effective
06:26
NASA's management waas
06:30
next thing. And this is you know, it's obvious now. It was very much, uh,
06:35
hidden behind the background or not fully appreciated at the time.
06:42
But the advantage to having a clear vision,
06:46
a quitter mission statement
06:48
almost can't be overstated. Just that ability is so
06:54
huge when you're trying to pull all these disparate team members together. So when you have pluralism, you have mistrust. You have, you know, bureaucratic infighting of all these things that happened in any kind of enterprise project.
07:06
But in the midst of all of that, you have a clear vision. We're gonna send
07:13
a group individual, whatever. We're gonna send people to the moon
07:16
before the end of the decade and then bring them back safely. There's of such a clear vision. It's very easy for the different stakeholders involved
07:26
to understand the vision and be able to make decisions to support the vision as opposed to decisions that
07:33
either, you know, uh,
07:35
awhile blame to fall somewhere els or protect their turf or increase their political power within the organization. All that kind of goes out the window when you have a very clear and concise vision.
07:49
They were also able to very effectively confront this descent
07:54
within the organization. If you recall from the reading there were a couple of different,
08:01
uh,
08:03
options with how they were going to go about performing the,
08:07
uh, space launch
08:09
the launch of lunar module landing a lunar module, the moon bringing the lunar module back to the main space capsule.
08:16
And they had quite a bit of dissent. And that dissent is cause some delays
08:22
within that decision. But if you notice that did not cause delays within the overall project,
08:28
and when the time came to make those decisions when it became part of the critical path,
08:33
they were able to make that decision and stand by that decision. And that allows
08:39
that project team
08:41
to be able to effectively execute. So when things seem to be delayed so we can, you know, do some more research to get some more discovery, stuff that's great
08:48
is long doesn't affect the critical path. So while they were working on the transition of the Mercury rockets to the Apollo rockets,
08:56
they were able to have that descend,
09:00
look at the different options
09:01
that were available to the team and ultimately make that decision. And that was critical to the success of the Apollo space program.
09:09
They also mastered PR and communication within the various stakeholders. So long before the idea of the racing matrix have been created.
09:18
They were able to keep the public engaged and excited and keep public of this case is funding the taxpayers so that helped them to fund the project and keep the money rolling.
09:30
A CZ well as keep positive PR for the project team as well as develop ways to effectively communicate across all of these different
09:39
disparate groups and units private, public sector or someone and so on. So that was really one of the things that they did exceptionally well. They kept
09:48
everybody to include the nation
09:50
focused on the goal of the moon landing,
09:54
and finally they were able to confront the Apollo one tragedy where the space capsule caught fire and all the astronauts were killed on the launch pad there in Houston.
10:07
And they were able to not only
10:09
kind of confronted, own it, accepted me best decisions from it, but then use emergence strategy to adjust the things that they were going to do, moving forward
10:20
based on the Apollo one incident. So that's a really good example of Enterprise Project Team confronting tragedy, which in this case with human life, which is unfortunate. But it also may be
10:31
tragedy in the sense of your organization or your project budget or whatever, but then use emergence strategy to come away from it,
10:39
better prepared and able to better plan.
10:41
So in summary, we cover two different case studies. One the Airbus A 3 80 which had some undesirable side effects of that project.
10:52
And the 2nd 1 is the Apollo space program, which really could be its own
10:56
webinar in unto itself,
11:00
but was so effective and was such a seminal moment within project management
11:07
that we were able to see how, given a similar set of challenges, that the group
11:13
in charge of the Apollo space project
11:16
was able to overcome a lot of things and ultimately be successful.
11:22
So I want to thank you again. We're coming almost to the conclusion of our lesser topic. Rather,
11:28
and we've got a couple more videos left and that will be it.
11:33
Have a great day.
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Course Assessment - Enterprise Project Management
Assessment
30m