Understanding Attacks

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Time
7 hours 50 minutes
Difficulty
Beginner
CEU/CPE
8
Video Transcription
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>> In this section, we're going to
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start talking about attacks.
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There are so many different types
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>> of attacks out there,
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>> network attacks, malware attacks.
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It really helps to break them down
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>> and look at the different types,
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>> so that way we know how to mitigate them.
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Our agenda is as follows.
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We're going to start by talking
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about the types of attackers,
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and we'll look at the types of attacks.
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Knowing the attackers and types of attacks,
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and the motivations for them
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>> will be helpful for us.
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>> We'll look at the different attack vectors,
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areas from which these attacks come.
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We'll talk about their payloads,
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we'll look at network-based attacks,
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attacks on passwords, wireless attacks,
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and then application attacks.
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Now, we'll talk about types of attackers.
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The term hacker was originally a positive term,
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and then it became negative,
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and now it's become positive again.
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People talk about having life hacks,
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>> and that's a good thing.
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>> People who do hacks have found
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>> clever ways to do things,
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>> and that's the way the term hacker
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>> was viewed in relation to computer skills.
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>> But then, it became negative in meaning.
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Technically, a hacker is someone
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>> who's extremely skilled,
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>> and then attacker is someone with malicious intent.
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Under the category of hackers,
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a white hat hacker is an ethical hacker.
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It's also synonymous with a pen tester.
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A black hat hacker is someone
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who hacks with malicious intent,
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usually for personal gain.
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A gray hat hacker is somewhere in the middle.
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Sometimes, you'll hear about somebody
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who takes a new release of software,
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and then they hack it to see
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>> if there are any vulnerabilities.
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>> If there are, they contact the software vendor
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>> and inform them of the vulnerabilities,
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>> and suggest that they fix them.
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But if the vendor ignores it
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and doesn't act upon that warning,
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then the gray hat releases
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that information to the public
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by posting it on the Internet,
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and then that leads to malicious activity.
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Script Kiddies as a derogatory term.
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It means someone with no real skills,
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someone who copies and paste scripts
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>> and runs basic scripts,
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>> but doesn't understand what they are doing.
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The thing about Script Kiddies
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>> is that they can be dangerous,
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>> because they don't know what they are doing,
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>> and don't understand the potential damage
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>> they could cause.
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>> Hacktivists are people who perform hacking
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>> in order to serve a political or social agenda.
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>> You may have heard of some of them,
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like Anonymous and LulzSec.
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During the 2016 US election,
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there were some hacktivist attacks
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>> to protest the way the founder
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>> of WikiLeaks was being treated.
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>> For example, the Democratic National
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>> Committee was hacked.
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>> State-sponsored attacks in cyber warfare are real,
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and it's incredibly critical that we defend
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ourselves and our nation's secrets,
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and our power grids, and water supplies, etc.
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Much of that is controlled by
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computer systems that can be
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attacked in state-sponsored attacks.
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We've also seen the reports about
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Russia interfering with our elections.
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These are things that we want to take really seriously.
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When we talk about state-sponsored attacks,
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these are usually attacks
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called advanced persistent threats.
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The attackers have plenty of time.
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If they don't find what they want today,
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then they can wait until next week,
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or next month, or next year.
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They often have pretty high-end sophisticated tools,
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and they just keep chipping away
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until they have what they are looking for.
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Do not underestimate the power of internal threats.
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Eighty percent of all fraud is initiated
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>> from within an organization,
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>> and two-thirds of security-related
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incidents are unintentional.
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We've got the potential
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>> for malicious attackers inside the organization.
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>> But we also have people with no ill intent
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>> who accidentally delete files,
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>> or modify records,
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or give out too much information on the phone.
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There are so many security incidents
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that have no malicious intent,
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and we've got to protect those too.
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When we're talking about fraud,
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we have to think about the principle
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>> of least privilege.
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>> Just give people the bare minimum
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to do what they need to do.
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Use need to know,
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so that only people who have
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>> a specific need for data
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>> have access to that data.
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>> Separations of duties is huge in preventing fraud.
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Make sure no one is unchecked.
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We always want to make sure no one
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has too much power in the network.
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Good policies, background checks,
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those are the things are going to be
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the best way to mitigate internal threats.
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