VM Templates and Markup

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Time
21 hours 25 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
21
Video Transcription
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>> Hey there, Cybrarians and welcome back to
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the Linux plus course here at Cybrary.
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I'm your instructor, Rob Giles.
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In today's lesson we're going to be covering
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VM templates and markup languages.
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Upon completion of today's lesson,
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you'll be able to explain the major VM template types,
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which are OVF and OVA.
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Also can talk about two different markup languages,
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JSON and YAML,
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or JSON and YAML.
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We're also going to determine why containers
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and container images should be used.
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The standard for virtual machine configurations
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is known as the Open Virtualization Format,
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which is abbreviated as OVF,
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and the OVF format is
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just a group of files that are packaged together.
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A single XML file in
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those files contains the configuration requirements,
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the environment requirements for the virtual machine.
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How many CPU sockets does it need?
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>> How many virtual CPU does it need?
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>> How much memory,
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and so on and so forth.
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But there is an issue with
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the OVF format and that there are a number of files,
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so it's a little bit trickier to transfer
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in OVF format because
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you got to make sure all those files are there.
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It's a real pain in the neck if you
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don't get them all transferred over.
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For this reason, the Open
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Virtualization Appliance format,
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the OVA, was created to address the issue.
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The OVA template just simply bundles all of
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the files from the OVF into one single file.
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Now let's talk about some of our markup languages.
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The first one is JSON.
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That stands for Java Script Object Notation.
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It uses a configuration file
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for containers, among other things.
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JSON is described as
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a human-readable data interchange format and
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it's used to exchange data between
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a server and a client or server,
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client and a web application.
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So you'll sometimes hear this referred to in
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relation to a RESTful API,
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that's something that is also used in JSON.
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YAML, or Yet Another Markup Language is
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used as a configuration file for containers as well.
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It's described as a
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human-friendly data serialization standard.
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YAML is commonly used
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to configure Docker and Kubernetes,
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and we'll also see YAML mentioned when we
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talk about Ansible later in this course.
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Let's talk a little bit about containers now.
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Containers are designed to virtualize an application.
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Other virtualization solutions are used to
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virtualize an entire Linux system or an entire server.
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But here we're just virtualizing an application.
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The way that that container does this is that it
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bundles all the files that are needed to
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run an application and everything that the application
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requires is stored inside the container.
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The most well-known container package
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out there today is Docker.
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Docker uses the concept of
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container image files for configuring containers.
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Container image is a read-only template and
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can be used if we want to create a container in Docker,
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and so you might also see these
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referred to as Docker images.
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In this lesson, we covered the common
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>> virtualization template formats, OVF and OVA.
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>> We also talked about the markup languages,
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JSON and YAML or JSON and YAML.
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Then we touched upon the concept of
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containers and container image templates.
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Thank you so much for being here and I look
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forward to seeing you in our next lesson.
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