Video Lab: Developing an Agile Schedule

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Time
3 hours 55 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
4
Video Transcription
00:01
>> Hello and welcome to Lesson 4.3,
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our video lab of developing an Agile schedule.
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A quick admin note,
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if you started seeing me doing the duck and weaving is
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because I have a webcam right in
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my face that is blocking the monitor.
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I apologize in advance,
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but I'm your instructor, Kane.
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I'm going to walk you through
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a brief example of developing a Agile schedule.
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For this video, we're going to use Microsoft's DevOps.
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There are numerous software suites
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and things that you can use.
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I just happened to have access to this one,
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so we're going to use it for
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this video and then I'll try to use something
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different for the next video labs so
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you can see different software options.
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What we've got here is a product backlog.
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As we talked about in the pure Agile video,
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once we've identified our structure,
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our schedule, our methodology.
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In this example, we're going to use Scrum with
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traditional Sprints or iterations, where [inaudible].
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The next step would be to develop the backlog.
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This is the all-encompassing backlog,
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but it's a living document.
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Remember, once we've identified what these items are,
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they can totally change day in,
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day out when something new pops up,
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just added to the backlog.
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I've got some items here and you'll
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notice that these are tagged
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with MVP minimum viable products.
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Those are the items that are for
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sure going to go in the first iteration.
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Then as I'm meeting
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with my team and meeting with my customer,
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I'll be adding more and more options.
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In this case, it'd be nice if it showed users' avatar.
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Doesn't really matter what the thing is,
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but we'll go ahead and add it.
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I'm meeting with the customer,
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I'm talking to people.
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I'm having requirements gathering sessions,
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but again, it's living documents.
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The more we know,
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the more we're going to add.
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At this point, we're really just adding to
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our to-do list, adding items.
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[NOISE] Then eventually I'll have this big giant backlog.
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This is all happening before I
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really even start the first iteration.
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I've got a backlog. I know it's living.
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I know it's going to grow day in and day out.
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But I'm going to have my first Sprint planning meeting,
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my first iteration meeting.
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I'm going to do a couple of different things.
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One, I'm going to figure out what
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the prioritization is and two,
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I'm going to figure out what the effort is.
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As this is my first iteration.
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I don't necessarily know
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what my team's velocity is going to be.
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Really, it's not even an educated guess.
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You just throw a number against the wall.
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Because as each iteration goes,
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you're going to get better and better at estimating.
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That's an important feature of the Sprint style,
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Scrum style of doing Agile.
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I've got these items and I'm going to
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sit down with my team and I'm going to say,
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let's talk about these items.
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Obviously, the MVPs have to go first.
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How much effort on a scale of, I'll pick 1-10.
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But again, it doesn't really matter.
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This item here, how much
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effort do I think it's going to be?
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I talked to my programmers,
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they say on a scale of 1-10,
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they feel like it's a five. Cool, it's a five.
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Then we'll look at the other items and I'm going to say,
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again, what's the effort?
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Notice how I'm not filling
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in and I'll show you on this next one.
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There is these other fields here about
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criticality and business value.
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I'm not really feeling those in right now.
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The reason why that is,
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and I'm going to assume this one is easy.
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But the reason why I'm not filling it out right now is
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because these are minimum viable products.
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I don't care.
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There's no decision-making at this point.
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Those are for sure going into the first iteration.
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I'm going to drag those
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over and I'm going to drop them into my current Sprint.
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You don't see them there yet.
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We're just weird but whatever. Now they're in my sprint.
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The next step, look at this as a board.
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It'll be a little easier. I've got
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these items that are minimum viable products,
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so they're definitely going into this sprint.
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Now I'm going to look at the other items
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and I'm actually going to look
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at adding those additional pieces of data.
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The ability to use PayPal,
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how much effort is it going to be?
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It's going to be a five.
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But for business value,
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I think it's going to be a seven out of 10.
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It's a big deal, I want to do it.
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I'd go through the rest of these that exact same way.
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[NOISE] Then when I
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get ready to decide what else can go in the backlog.
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I don't know why
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that's working that way, but we'll go back to the board.
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I've got these additional items,
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I have their effort and I have their business value,
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and I already have
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a certain amount of effort in the Sprint.
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I haven't spent a lot of time customizing
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this particular project for the demo,
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but I've got, I think it's two fives and a one.
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I've got 11 effort points in my Sprint.
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We've already decided in our meeting
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that we think we can do 15.
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Don't know, but we think we can do 15.
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I'm going to look at
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these other items that I'm going to say,
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okay, this effort is a 10.
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It's going to be really hard.
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The business value is a three.
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It's a nice-to-have, but we're not really worried
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about it, so on and so on.
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Everything has a score at
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this point and they actually do sell.
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I don't have one with me. I left them at work.
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But they do sell Agile
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scoring card decks like a deck of cards.
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That's really convenient and useful to
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have during these planning sessions because
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it's almost like using a Delphi technique where you
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pass out a deck to
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each individual or a portion of the deck.
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I think there's four sizes
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in the deck anyway, doesn't matter.
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But you pass out this deck of cards and everybody gets
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the opportunity to score
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each item in their priority matrix.
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But the key is,
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once you burn a card, you don't get to use it again.
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It's a fun and interactive way to get
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the project team to do
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a really good job of
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prioritizing and scoring these items.
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if I think something's a 10,
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I'm going to use it, but then
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my 10 card is gone and I don't get to use it anymore.
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I only have one through
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nine or whatever the case might be.
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That's a good way of,
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there's a term I can't remember the exact name of it,
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but it's basically the wisdom of the masses.
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If you ask a thousand people to guess, for example,
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how many gumballs are in a gumball machine,
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and you take the mean, the average of that,
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of all of their guesses,
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then you're going to statistically
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be very close to the actual answer,
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even if every individual person is not that wise,
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the mass of people voting or
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bidding tends to be
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closer to write on average than anything else.
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There is a certain,
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you always hear about bad things about masses,
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but there are some good things about
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large groups of people, large sample sizes.
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Once we've scored everything out and we
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have four effort points left in our Sprint.
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We're going to go ahead and pick an item that
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or multiple items that meets that requirement.
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Let's say this item right here,
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it's a nice to have,
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but it only takes four effort points.
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It's only got a one for business value,
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but I only have four points left.
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I'm going to go ahead and bring that into my Sprint.
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This is all happening at
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the very beginning of your Sprint.
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I now have work items that I'm going to be working on.
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I assign them to people.
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Ideally, each person or
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each item should only
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require one person's worth of effort.
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You're not necessarily doing really complicated thing.
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These are all supposed to be very
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tactical things that I can
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accomplish in two weeks and get to production.
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There you go. The meeting
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adjourns and we all go back to our desks or whatever,
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and we start working on these things.
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Once we get to the end of
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the Sprint or as I'm completing thing,
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let's just say once I complete this task,
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I move it over, complete this task,
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move it over, so on and so on.
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We get to the end of this.
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Give myself a little bit more credit.
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Get to the end of the Sprint. Here we are.
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Now it's time to put stuff into
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production, close items out.
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Notice how this item here did not get completed.
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That's because the nice-if-it-showed users avatar
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was my lowest priority item.
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I ran out of time.
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My estimation skills aren't all that great.
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Notice two things are going to happen.
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One, I'm going to move all of this
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to none once it goes into production.
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This is all during the Sprint retrospective.
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They're gone, they're done, they're gone.
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The next thing I'm going to do is I'm going to take
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this item and I'm putting it back into the backlog.
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I clear these two lanes.
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Done. Now, when I go to plan iteration number
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2 the nice-if-it-showed users avatar
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doesn't get any extra credit
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because I've already started working on it.
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If it's not in production,
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it goes back into the backlog
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and it just hangs out there.
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We go back to looking at some of these other items.
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This should-item, for example,
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outweighs this nice-to-have item.
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Automatically it's going to be approved after we
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figure out the effort and the business value,
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but it's higher in
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the priority list, it's going to be approved.
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While all this is happening,
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the product owner and the customer as
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they're testing the system and doing things with it.
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They can come in here
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anytime and keep adding things to the backlog.
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Visualize this is happening
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all during that two-week Sprint.
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Now when I actually go back
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and pretend that I didn't finish that.
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I'm back to my Sprint planning,
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but notice I've got all these new things now.
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I have to go back and look at
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everything with a fresh set of
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eyes in order to decide what makes it into the Sprint.
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What's the value to the business? What's the effort?
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How much throughput do I have?
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This cycle would be repeated during each iteration of
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the Agile execution process until I either
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completely run out of backlog items
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which never going to happen in real life,
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or I run out of time, my project is
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a three-year project and then it's over.
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That's a brief walk-through on
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executing and developing a schedule
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for a purely Agile project.
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Thank you very much and have a great day.
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