Securing Your Password

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Time
40 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
1
Video Transcription
00:00
Hello, Martin is Dustin, and welcome to password cracking.
00:05
Now that we've discussed passwords and how easily they can be cracked,
00:09
what can we do to help secure them?
00:12
One of the first things to remember is that in most cases the longer a password is, the longer the time it will take to crack.
00:22
Most places are actually gang away from passwords and creating what's called are what's known as a pass phrase
00:30
a past phrases, a password that involves multiple ideally random words.
00:36
Using a pass phrase makes it easy to remember and much more difficult to crack because it's much longer than a standard password.
00:45
It's always ideal to use a different password for everything that you do so like a different password on your banking site and your social media sites. Although this method does make it somewhat difficult to remember where each password was used,
01:02
one thing you can do to help keep track of your passwords is use a password manager.
01:07
A password manager is a central repositories for all of your passwords that keeps your passwords and an encrypted database.
01:15
This is a great way to protect all of your passwords, but keeping them all in one place can also be a little bit dangerous.
01:25
Many password managers decrypt the whole database after you enter that first initial password to log in.
01:30
If someone were to gain access to your computer while the database was unlocked, they now have access to all of your passwords.
01:40
So it's important to remember that a password manager is is only as good as the first initial password required in order to decrypt the data base.
01:49
It's always best to evaluate the various password managers out there and find one that's going to work best for you.
02:00
So in this module will be learned a lot about passwords. We learned how passwords can be stored and the safest ways to do so. We also learned about cracking passwords and a few ways to do it with John the Ripper and came the able.
02:15
After we learned how to crack passwords, we talked about a few ways to make your passwords more difficult to crack and also easier to manage
02:25
up. Next, we'll be going over a P T or advanced persistent threat. Groups stay tuned, but first we've got a quick quiz.
02:37
First question. Which tool was designed to crack a UNIX system. Passwords.
02:42
Was it a Cain and Abel
02:45
be Jack the Ripper.
02:46
See John the Ripper
02:50
or D Creed in Andy?
02:53
It will give you a second to think about that one, but it should be pretty easy.
03:00
That's right. John the Ripper was designed to crack UNIX system passwords.
03:05
Kevin can't keep track of his passwords, so he started using a password manager.
03:09
His password manager offers various options to secure his passwords. Which of the following options would be the most secure?
03:19
Is it a plane tax storage?
03:22
Be half storage,
03:23
sea salt and pepper hash?
03:28
Or is it D onion hash?
03:35
That's right. The most secure option would be salting in peppering the hash.
03:40
Last question. Creed needs help creating a new pass phrase. Which of the following would be the most secure?
03:49
Is it a www dot c r 33 d t h o u g h t s dot gov dot www backslash c r e d capital T H
04:06
zero u g
04:09
HTS
04:12
Or would it be be capital B zero b o d y exclamation point?
04:18
Or would it be? See dollar sign capital s C U B A
04:26
What would the most secure password be?
04:29
Capital? C R E d 123 semicolon?
04:40
That's right out of the choices. They would be the most secure one. But now that we've put them all out on the Internet and plain text, I wouldn't recommend any of them because they're all going in my dictionaries.