Project Governance and Management

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Time
7 hours 15 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
8
Video Transcription
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>> Hi there, and welcome back to
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Certified Information Systems Auditor.
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We'll now commence Module 4,
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which is Domain 3,
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information system acquisition development,
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and implementation. Let's begin.
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As with the other domains,
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these are your learning objectives
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and task statements which
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isochore mandate for anyone doing this particular exam.
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These are important references
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for your review and for your study,
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just to note down to make sure that
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you've covered everything in the modules.
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Our first topic is project governance and management.
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In this module, we'll be looking
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at what project management is,
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some of the practices,
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the life cycle and structure of projects,
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some of the roles and responsibilities
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that take place within projects,
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the project management office or PMO,
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project initiation and objectives,
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and some planning structures.
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Let's begin. What is project management?
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Basically, it underpins the acquisition, development,
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and implementation process of most organizations.
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You as a Certified Information Systems Auditor,
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will be involved in a number of
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projects and a lot of project work of your career.
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In a lot of organizations,
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you can have several projects running concurrently.
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Depending upon the size of the organization,
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there could be any number
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of them running at the same time.
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The project portfolio management is
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basically a function that
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will identify the common objectives,
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identify and manage risk,
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and identify resource connections.
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As you can imagine in a large organization,
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if you do have several projects running at the same time,
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there is a possibility that there
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might be some priorities or
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some requirements or outcomes which
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will be the same across multiple projects.
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That's why project portfolio management
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is fairly important.
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Also, project management structure,
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policy and procedures and controls,
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these will all be important things within an organization
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that should be sent down and should
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be controlled and managed.
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The project management practice,
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so it's basically the application of knowledge, skills,
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tools, and techniques to a broad range
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of activities to achieve a stated objective.
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Put very simply, it's organizations getting stuff done.
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There are three main objectives which you'll
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often find for most projects,
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regardless of what they are,
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what the user requirements are,
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so what they want, the budget,
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how much money can be spent on it,
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and the deadlines when it is actually due.
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Projects will often begin with a project charter,
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which is essentially
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a high-level statement or document that
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really determines exactly what
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the outcome of the project is going to be.
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Let's have a look at the project management life cycle.
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This is from the Project Management
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Institute and it's from
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the Guide to the Project
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Management Body of Knowledge, fifth edition.
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If you're needing to find a little bit more
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about how projects work and how they're managed,
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that would be a good starting point for you.
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It's a very simple process at a high level.
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There's a starting point,
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it's initiating phase in which the project is defined,
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stakeholders are engaged, resources are obtained,
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and budget is allocated.
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Then there is a cycle of planning and
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executing which is controlled
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and monitored throughout that life cycle.
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Then we finally finish up with the closing,
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which is hopefully the resulting outcome
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of a successful project and an end result.
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Then the closing and end of the project.
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There are
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quite a few different project management structures
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that you might encounter.
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They're loosely defined under three main types.
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You have a functional structured organization.
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In this case, the project manager is drawing upon
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resources from other departments
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>> within the organization.
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>> The project manager is responsible
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for the actual delivery of the project,
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but doesn't have any formal management authority
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over the resources.
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You also have a project structured organization.
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In this case, the project manager has formal authority
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over those who are taking part in
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the project and manages the budget,
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the time frames,
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and the deadlines comprehensively.
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Then finally, there is a matrix structured organization,
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which could be a combination of
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functional structured organization
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and project structured organization.
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The roles and responsibilities
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of project management are fairly varied.
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You'll often see in large projects,
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a project steering committee which
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could be made up of senior stakeholders,
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senior management, or people
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who are relevant to the particular project.
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Or you may just have representatives from
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senior management who have oversight.
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There's often a project sponsor.
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This is the person who has
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actually decided to undertake that particular project,
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enlarge area projects, you
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might also have user management,
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in which case, if they're just particularly a project
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that will have ramifications on a user population,
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you might need very specific areas of user management.
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We also have project teams,
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project managers, obviously.
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Quality assurance is obviously
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a fairly important part that
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basically an area that's might determine
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exactly the quality outcomes of the project.
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Depending upon the nature of the project,
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it could be systems development management
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or a system development project team.
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Obviously, security plays a part in this
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and the information system security engineers.
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Project management techniques at the very high level,
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are fairly simple and there's three of them.
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Budget, how much the project
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is going to cost, the duration,
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how long it's going to take to actually produce,
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and obviously the key deliverables of the project.
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What E is going to be produced over
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the time and the budget that's being allocated.
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In organizations, you'll often see terms such
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as portfolio management or program management.
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Project portfolio is all the projects being
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carried out in an organization
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at any given point in time.
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That is a helicopter view of
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an organization's project functions which
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could be very keyed into
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strategic goals and objectives of the business.
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It really is how
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the business is going to function today and the future.
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We have programs.
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Groups have projects that are linked
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closely through common strategies.
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There might be a number of
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different application upgrades which all
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have a common requirement across that organization.
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For large organizations, you'll often find
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a project management office or a PMO.
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The project management office owns
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the project management and program management process.
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In other words, they'll be in charge of running,
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the execution of old projects within an organization,
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and also the processes and
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the procedures that govern them.
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This will be an all permanent organizational structure,
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so you'll often have a project
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management office made up of
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dedicated personnel who do
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nothing but project management.
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They'll often basically maintain
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a project portfolio database to
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keep track of a large number of
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projects that may be in their portfolio,
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and they are responsible for the benefits realization.
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That's a key test of any project,
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is determining if the benefits of
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the project can be realized by the organization.
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Kicking off a project or
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project initiation is very simple generally.
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It's usually one-on-one meetings,
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so all stakeholders can get into a room to
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determine the scope and the outcomes of the project.
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A number of kickoff meetings involving stakeholders or
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end-users potentially will often
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guide the commencement of the project.
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Then there might be a number of workshops that will
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certainly define the actual activities
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that are going on within a project,
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or a combination of all three.
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Project objectives. These need to be
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specific statements that support the project goals.
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You may have heard the acronym SMART previously,
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so any project objectives need to be very specific.
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They need to be able to be measured.
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They also need to be attainable and realistic and timely.
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Looking at any objectives in a project,
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particularly from an audit perspective,
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you need to apply the SMART measure
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against anything that you are reviewing.
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Planning structures, there's a few options here,
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depending upon the nature and the size of the project.
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They can be broken down into a number of areas,
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so either by objectives.
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Each project is managed based upon
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the objectives that their outcomes are going to be.
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A work breakdown structure,
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so these are the actual specific tasks that need to be
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completed by the resources within the project,
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or even work packages which basically roll up a lot of
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the work breakdown structure items
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or the objective breakdown structure items.
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A couple of key points on planning structure.
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The work breakdown structures or
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any of the breakdown structure are
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hierarchical and go down into
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further level of detail and granularity,
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the further down you go.
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You also need to look at basically the work duration,
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the costs of each of
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the tasks within each of the structures,
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clearly defined and part of that.
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You'll often see that represented in a Gantt chart
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in programs like Microsoft Project, for example.
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Work packages should also be
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relatively defined to be relatively short,
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so it shouldn't really exceed 10 days duration,
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and work packages should be unique and should not be
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duplicated across the work breakdown structure.
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Depending upon the nature of the project,
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these are tools which you are able to use to
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describe and further define
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the complexities of your project.
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That's it for our lesson in project management.
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We've basically covered a little bit
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what project management is,
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a few of the practices,
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some of the lifecycle and structures,
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the roles and responsibilities involved within
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projects and the stakeholders,
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the techniques involved in project management,
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the portfolio program management practices,
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the project management office,
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and something on the planning structures as well.
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We hope you enjoyed
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this lesson and I'll see you at the next one.
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