Minimum Viable Product/Value Delivery Part 2

Video Activity
Join over 3 million cybersecurity professionals advancing their career
Sign up with
Required fields are marked with an *
or

Already have an account? Sign In »

Time
3 hours 55 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
4
Video Transcription
00:01
>> Hello and welcome to lesson 5.5:
00:01
Minimum Viable Product and Value Delivery Part 2.
00:01
Today we're going to talk about the
00:01
second dirty little secret of agile.
00:01
The first dirty little secret,
00:01
as you recall from a previous video,
00:01
is the fact that we have
00:01
this non-methodology thing that's
00:01
going to focus on working product
00:01
over all of these different processes.
00:01
Then we develop methodologies [LAUGHTER] for them
00:01
and start to lock people into a specific methodology,
00:01
which is the antithesis to agile.
00:01
That's the first dirty secret.
00:01
The second dirty little secret
00:01
about agile is gold-plating.
00:01
The idea of gold-plating.
00:01
Let's talk about this. What is gold-plating?
00:01
In PMI definition, they equate gold plating or adding
00:01
additional extraneous features that are not part of
00:01
that minimum viable product
00:01
with what's known as scope creep.
00:01
In traditional project management,
00:01
project managers are,
00:01
for better or worse,
00:01
judged basically on their ability to
00:01
turn in a project on time,
00:01
on budget, and
00:01
meet the performance criteria that the project has.
00:01
It's known as the triple constraint.
00:01
If you were a project sponsor
00:01
and you came to me and you said,
00:01
hey, wouldn't it be cool if we could do x, y, and z?
00:01
I'm looking at you automatically with a little bit of
00:01
distrust because what I see is scope creep,
00:01
where a lot of projects fail.
00:01
Matter of fact, almost half of
00:01
all projects fail, especially the big ones,
00:01
is they fail because
00:01
the project manager is unable to manage
00:01
that scope creep and the project goes on and on forever,
00:01
the budget gets blown out of proportion and
00:01
you end up basically running out of time and
00:01
money to deliver all of these items.
00:01
You either have to drastically reduce scope or do
00:01
some other type of
00:01
remediation technique to get the project back on track.
00:01
Probably the most notable exception
00:01
of this is aircraft projects.
00:01
If you look at the F35 for
00:01
the US government and how far over budget it's become,
00:01
as well as the Boeing, Airbus,
00:01
it's one of those case studies and what
00:01
not to do in project management.
00:01
Some of the things that they
00:01
did and created that caused these projects to fail.
00:01
But a lot of that is based on scope creep,
00:01
inability to manage scope.
00:01
Here we come along,
00:01
agile shows up and agile says, hey,
00:01
we're going to continuously add new things
00:01
to the product backlog as the project is ongoing.
00:01
Some organizations basically never
00:01
let the project end
00:01
because as long as there's items in the backlog,
00:01
the project is still ongoing.
00:01
This is where the idea of gold-plating an agile together,
00:01
get a really bad rap
00:01
because to a traditional project manager,
00:01
the idea of adding new changes to the project on a daily,
00:01
weekly basis creates a never-ending project,
00:01
and if the never-ending project
00:01
then you're not doing your job as a project manager.
00:01
Agile projects have a really bad reputation
00:01
in some organizations and areas for cost management.
00:01
It's like, hey, I just take this money and I
00:01
pour it into a bucket day in,
00:01
day out, year in,
00:01
year out, and I'm not really seeing the value.
00:01
Remember, we talked about
00:01
business value in the previous video.
00:01
This is where agile can go off the rails.
00:01
If you don't understand and
00:01
focus on that minimum viable project or product,
00:01
and where the value delivery is,
00:01
and how we're delivering value to
00:01
the organization then the business owners and
00:01
the customers are going to look
00:01
at this as a black hole that
00:01
we poured a bunch of money
00:01
into and nothing good came with it.
00:01
How do we prevent that?
00:01
How do we set ourselves up for success and prevent
00:01
the idea that we're gold-plating
00:01
all this stuff and we're not actually bringing value?
00:01
Couple of things. One, the infamous project charter,
00:01
and if you've ever watched any of my other videos,
00:01
I tend to harp on the project charter quite a bit
00:01
because it's the most important
00:01
but least understood and
00:01
enforced part of project management.
00:01
Getting that sponsor to sign off on the project charter.
00:01
That helps tremendously.
00:01
The reason why that is, as you can imagine,
00:01
the project sponsor, much like you if you are building
00:01
your own home once everything is under the sun.
00:01
If you can give me
00:01
cool stuff and I don't have to pay for it,
00:01
then I want the cool stuff.
00:01
I want as much cool features
00:01
as I can possibly get for my dollar.
00:01
There's nothing wrong with that.
00:01
That's a good project sponsor or
00:01
product sponsor or product owner in
00:01
the case of agile or
00:01
scrum, that's what they should want.
00:01
I want everything because it's their money at work.
00:01
But if you spend some time and some energy getting
00:01
that project charter understood
00:01
in the case of an Agile project,
00:01
having that include
00:01
those minimum viable product features,
00:01
and have an iterative
00:01
requirements traceability matrix, meaning,
00:01
[NOISE] every time we go to add items to the backlog,
00:01
what requirement or what
00:01
minimum viable product or what deliverable.
00:01
Some of these terms are interchangeable,
00:01
but what strategic value-driven thing
00:01
is this feature going to provide to me?
00:01
If the answer is none,
00:01
it would just be really cool.
00:01
Then I see where PMI is coming from
00:01
when they say that is
00:01
scope creep and we shouldn't be doing it.
00:01
Because you really shouldn't be
00:01
doing work that the customer is
00:01
not going to value or the business is not going to value.
00:01
Just because you can gash or it's cool,
00:01
but that's a waste of time.
00:01
However, if an item comes
00:01
into the product backlog and you have
00:01
a good requirements traceability matrix and you can
00:01
show how that item is going to
00:01
bring value to the organization,
00:01
then that's something that you really do want to add.
00:01
There's a way of managing an agile project that's not
00:01
necessarily super common today
00:01
where you are providing project governance.
00:01
It's not just a black hole where
00:01
the developers go into
00:01
a room and get to do whatever they want.
00:01
If we do our job in the planning phase and set
00:01
up our minimum viable product features,
00:01
or should have features,
00:01
or would like to have features and we prioritize
00:01
things correctly and on top of all that,
00:01
we understand the business value that those features
00:01
bring each time a new one is added to the backlog,
00:01
then we can prevent what gold plating really is,
00:01
which is features that the customer doesn't have value,
00:01
not necessarily scope creep.
00:01
Agile, we want some scope creep because we want
00:01
new ideas to be brought forward
00:01
during the project execution phase
00:01
so that we can act on them,
00:01
act on reality when things change.
00:01
We don't want is features that bring
00:01
the organization or the customer no value.
00:01
That's the difference between gold plating,
00:01
as is commonly understood in the PMI world and how
00:01
it applies to agile and true gold plating,
00:01
which is adding extraneous features to a project and
00:01
burning resources on them
00:01
when not even the customer values them.
00:01
I love this picture, it's hilarious.
00:01
But that's the goal.
00:01
If it has organizational value,
00:01
we want the scope creep.
00:01
If it doesn't have organizational value,
00:01
then we don't want the scope creep.
00:01
Even in agile, we have a limited amount of scope
00:01
because the iron triangle
00:01
of project management is still a real thing.
00:01
In today's video, we discussed
00:01
gold plating and the issues that
00:01
gold plating bring to
00:01
agile and how it has a bad reputation,
00:01
and how we want to prevent that plus I
00:01
showed you a pretty hilarious picture.
00:01
Anyway, I want to thank everybody
00:01
and I will see you in the next video.
Up Next