Time
14 hours 13 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
20

Video Description

Configuring High Availability in a Cluster (continued) This lesson continues discussing configuring high availability in a cluster. When you configure high availability, you can look at the resource allocation tab to see how a cluster is set up. You can discover the status of a cluster in the hosts tab. Advanced options within vSphere allow you to control individual discreet settings.

Video Transcription

00:04
All right. Welcome to part two of lesson to module 11. We're still talking about H A high availability. When you configure a J.
00:13
You have some, uh,
00:15
different tabs that show up in your,
00:18
uh,
00:20
in N V center for that cluster.
00:23
What we can do is look at the resource allocation tab
00:26
to see how
00:28
our cluster is actually set up.
00:30
You'll have a section for CPU, and the memory portion is actually to the side of that. I put it underneath here for
00:36
for using the space look more effectively.
00:39
But it tells you what your total capacity and CPU is what your reserve capacity is, and you're available capacity.
00:45
And this will very depending on
00:48
how many hosts are in your cluster, how many processors physical processors are on those hosts.
00:54
The same thing would change with your available memory. So whatever, Whatever you've got available with as an aggregate of memory, and the cluster should show up here, your total capacity, how much is in reserve and how much is how much is available.
01:08
So this tells you had a glance how your clusters doing from a resource consumption point of view and how many more resource is might be available. If you want to continue to add virtual machines to this cluster,
01:21
you can also
01:23
go to the cluster status link.
01:26
So there's a three different tabs here we have a hosts tab
01:30
that shows you what the master host is. You Yes, *** one, for instance. How many hosts are connected to the master? If I have a four host cluster, I would have a master and three hosts connected to it.
01:44
I can also see the VM stab.
01:47
This shows me how many Of'em Zehr protected because they're running in the cluster environment.
01:51
And then how many might be unprotected?
01:53
This will very depending on how your configuration is set up.
01:57
And also we have another tab for the harpy data stores
02:01
and that shows you,
02:04
uh, some data stores that were configured for heart beats. In the case of the lab, I've got an NFS data store for that
02:10
purpose.
02:14
We also have another link in the cluster area that allows you to look at the advanced options for slot size.
02:21
You'll see these settings when you're when you're looking at the lab later.
02:25
So what? The advanced options with envy sphere allow you to go into
02:30
a very low level, almost like the registry for Windows or the Colonel for a UNIX system. These are individuals, discreet settings that you can control, various aspects of security features, performance features and so on.
02:44
And so what we can do is change some of these parameters,
02:47
like a d a s dot b M C P U.
02:52
Actually, I said that should say men megahertz not miss,
02:54
So I can specify a minimum amount of megahertz for the slot size. I can also specify a minimum amount of megabytes for that slot size.
03:05
The same thing with setting maximums Aiken
03:07
at the desk top slot C P. One megahertz has not slot meme in megabytes,
03:15
and this allows me again, too.
03:16
Specify the minimum of the maximum size for the slots, and that gives you a way to subdivide You're available. Memory and CP Resource is
03:25
to accommodate the most possible be EMS.
03:29
It's a bit of a narc and assigns. Once you start working
03:32
with larger clusters and lots of'em, you'll see that the slot size parameters can have a dramatic impact on the number of the EMS that are being utilized.
03:42
You don't want this lot too big,
03:44
because if of'em needs at least one slot to operate,
03:46
you want that slot to be sized so that the BM is comfortable.
03:51
It has enough memory and processor capacity. Within that slot. It was too large. Now, every time I allocate a slot for of'em, I'm using up a bigger chunk of my available resources, and that might turn out to work against me
04:04
within the the properties for your cluster, you can always click.
04:09
Also click the advanced Runtime Info link
04:12
and this tells you for a given cluster what its parameters are.
04:15
So the cluster might be called. Training tells me what my slot sizes 512 megahertz I'm using to Virtual CP use, and I have 1100 megabytes of RAM. That's one slot.
04:29
Then it tells me how many slots air in the cluster
04:31
because the cluster doesn't have a lot of memory. Maybe I can only support two slots
04:36
I'm using.
04:39
She doesn't make sense.
04:41
Used the total thoughts and closer should been 12. Sorry about that.
04:44
I'm using the three socks out of available 12.
04:48
Uh, there's,
04:50
uh, that would be nine left over
04:54
total part powered on V EMS is three
04:57
or whatever this is. And you see if this will change as your VMS power up in power down or as you modify the slot configuration parameters
05:06
tells you how many holster and the cluster, How many good host on the cluster?
05:10
These are just sample values, obviously. But when we do the lab, you'll be able to see that
05:15
the, uh,
05:17
the cluster
05:18
run time in four will change once we modify some of these parameters and you can see how this will affect the overall operation.
05:28
Okay, So, to recap,
05:30
we know that we can look at the resource allocation, Tad, to see how the memory processor is divided up inside the cluster,
05:36
we can check the cluster status to see how many hosts are running. What the master host is
05:43
how many of'em were protected
05:45
with the day stores are for heartbeats,
05:47
and then we have some minimum and maximum slot size parameters that we can see reflected once we look at the advance runtime info.
05:56
Okay, that concludes lesson to thank you

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