Hypervisor Types

Video Activity
Join over 3 million cybersecurity professionals advancing their career
Sign up with
Required fields are marked with an *
or

Already have an account? Sign In »

Time
21 hours 25 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
21
Video Transcription
00:00
>> Hey, Cybrarians.
00:00
Welcome back to the Linux+ course here at Cybrary.
00:00
I'm your instructor, Rob Goelz,
00:00
and in today's lesson,
00:00
we're going to be discussing Hypervisor Types.
00:00
Upon completion of today's lesson,
00:00
you're going to be able to differentiate between Type 1,
00:00
Type 2, and embedded hypervisors.
00:00
We're going to talk about the concept of chroots and
00:00
we'll also talk about different container types.
00:00
Hypervisor types, for the purposes of Linux+ exam,
00:00
we need to know about three
00:00
different types of hypervisors.
00:00
The first one is a Type 1,
00:00
sometimes known as a bare-metal hypervisor,
00:00
and it is so known because this type of
00:00
hypervisor is installed directly on the physical system.
00:00
It has full access to the underlying system hardware,
00:00
and a good example of this is
00:00
the VMware ESXi hypervisor;
00:00
that's a type of Type 1 hypervisor.
00:00
Now a Type 2 hypervisor is just an application of
00:00
virtualization application that gets
00:00
installed on top of a host operating system.
00:00
Windows running VirtualBox is
00:00
an example of this or running VirtualBox
00:00
on macOS is a great example of Type 2 hypervisor.
00:00
Early editions of Microsoft Hyper-V
00:00
worked this way around 2008,
00:00
last time that I played with them.
00:00
Then there's another type of
00:00
hypervisor known as an embedded hypervisor,
00:00
and this is used in embedded Linux systems and
00:00
can contain something called a real-time OS or RTOS.
00:00
You'll see this a lot in self-driving cars or automation.
00:00
An embedded hypervisor is
00:00
programmed into the processor; it lives on-chip.
00:00
Chroots or a root jail is something that is used to allow
00:00
an administrator to make
00:00
applications think that they actually have root access.
00:00
In reality, what happens is that
00:00
that application only has access to
00:00
certain components and portions of
00:00
the root filesystem that
00:00
you'd want them to have access to.
00:00
The root access provided to
00:00
the application is actually a virtual root filesystem,
00:00
and well, why would you do this?
00:00
This sounds like a lot of work.
00:00
Well, mostly for security.
00:00
We don't want this application
00:00
to have access to everything.
00:00
We want to limit the root access for this application.
00:00
We also want to separate applications.
00:00
We want to make sure that we
00:00
have an application running on one chroot,
00:00
doesn't touch the data and contents of
00:00
the filesystems running in
00:00
another chroot or running in the main filesystem.
00:00
Now we're going to talk about
00:00
containers again a little bit.
00:00
To reiterate, containers are
00:00
environments that are made up of files,
00:00
and they contain libraries and configurations that
00:00
are required to run an application.
00:00
Containers are just virtualized applications,
00:00
rather than virtualizing entire operating system,
00:00
you just virtualize an application.
00:00
There are two main types of
00:00
containers that are out there today.
00:00
There are LXC containers,
00:00
Linux containers, and Docker.
00:00
LXC is an older container package and it
00:00
has basically a stripped-down operating system,
00:00
and Docker packages are just
00:00
wrapping applications and dependencies
00:00
together into what's called a container
00:00
image or Docker image by comparison.
00:00
In this lesson, we covered the three types of
00:00
hypervisors: Type 1 like ESXi,
00:00
Type 2 like VirtualBox running on a Windows machine,
00:00
and the third type, embedded hypervisors,
00:00
that are used in self-driving cars and automation.
00:00
We also talked about the concepts
00:00
about chroot or root jail,
00:00
and then finally,
00:00
>> we touched on container package types.
00:00
>> Thanks so much for being here and I look forward to
00:00
seeing you in our next lesson.
Up Next