BeEF Framework Demo

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Time
21 hours 43 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
22
Video Transcription
00:01
>> We have the BeEF framework up and running in our browser.
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We've already launched it,
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but let's follow our methodology.
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We typically do our Nmap scan.
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Let's say I have a host, I already have
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some information that port 25 is open and I
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want to figure out what the version is
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of whatever software is running on port 25.
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I can see its Code-Crafters
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Ability Mail Server smtpd 2013.
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We can do search exploit,
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the Ability Mail Server 2013,
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and we see that we have two exploits for
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persistent cross-site scripting vulnerabilities
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and there's a Python script here.
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I can also go to that or search for that in Exploit DB.
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This is what differentiates you from script kiddies,
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is the fact that you can look at this script,
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and his is what you need to do for OSEP,
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and you need to start picking this apart.
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I'm doing this early, because there's
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a public exploit module,
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but let's start thinking about this now.
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I see a hard-coded IP;
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I need to change that,
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I see port 25;
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that's good. We already have port 25.
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I see an email address of user@hack.local,
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is that going to be the same for
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our environment? Start thinking about it.
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You don't have to know Python per se,
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but you should understand
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the underlying code and be able to
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modify the code, which is what I did.
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I took a look at the code and I said,
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"I need to change this to fit my
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environment." Let me show you my code.
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What I did is I modified the code.
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What I did is I
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know that there's a user@localhost
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and there's an admin@localhost.
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My objective is to get the username and
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password of the admin user.
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You can see here that the content type is text HTML,
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which is important because it
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will do our script tag here.
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Script document location,
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I'll show you that in the slides,
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is my controlled server
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192.168.1.228 in this index page,
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so it should redirect the victim to our control page.
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It's going to look a lot like
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the login page for this application.
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Here is the victim's IP address, port 25.
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The login is user@localhost.
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I already have this information,
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their password is user,
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and I'm sending it from user to admin.
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Let's launch this and give it a go and see what happens.
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Here we go. I'm launching this.
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Here's my admin. He's going to log in or
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she and they're going
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to go to inbox.
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They see they have a message and it says,
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"Urgent, please read."
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Well, they got to read it.
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They click and it says, "You've been logged out.
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Please log back in." Okay, well,
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there are my credentials again, click "Login".
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Something's not working here.
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Let's go back and then I'll know what's going on.
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If we go back,
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let's take a look at
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BeEF and we see we've hooked their browser here.
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Internet Explorer. Wow, they're old school.
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This isn't the old-school box, the XP.
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But we have a whole bunch of information here.
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Let's look at logs,
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and you can see here
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that there's a whole bunch of information.
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It captures all the keystrokes on the page.
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You can see that the user is admin
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and the password is password12345.
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If I wanted to,
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I could then go in port 8000,
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and now I can log in as the admin.
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There we go. I could also do
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some other things like if you
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really like the big scary one
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that I showed you before, create alert dialog.
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Just in case you want to give it a try.
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Let's see if that executes, there you go.
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Message from webpage1.
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I hope you see that BeEF is much more
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impactful on what you can do.
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There's a bunch of other things you can do here,
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but for my purposes as the attacker,
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I have what I came for.
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I came for the username and password, and I got it.
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Play around with BeEF,
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see if you like it.
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Again, it's a client-side attack
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so you need someone to click
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on the link and execute it.
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What I also want to show you was if we're here,
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if we view the source of the page,
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I should see,
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here it is; the script tag that I made on my evil page.
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I made it look like the login for this application,
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but buried in all this script or
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all this HTML is
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this script tag for my BeEF hook right there.
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Sure a savvy victim will be able to see that,
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but it's too late for them.
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But that's how I made that page.
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Hopefully, that makes sense, but again,
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remember methodology, scan, enumerate,
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figure out the version.
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Ultimately from that, look at
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public exploit code and modify it to fit
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your environment and then
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grab the username and password of the victim.
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