Video Lab: Developing a Wagile/Scrumfall Schedule

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Time
3 hours 55 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
4
Video Transcription
00:01
>> Hello and welcome to Lesson 4.4,
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our Video Lab on developing a Scrumfall or a Wagile,
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basically a hybrid schedule.
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There's all kinds of different names for it.
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I'm your instructor Kane,
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and if you recall from
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the last video when we were looking at
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a schedule for a purely Agile project,
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we used Microsoft DevOps.
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In this case, I'm going to use
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something different just to show you
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some different software that's available
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for these different types of tasks.
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Let's go ahead and get started.
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This is a traditional
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waterfall-type software development project.
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Those of you that have done waterfall projects before,
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this should look pretty familiar.
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You notice you've got
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your planning phase, your requirements,
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gathering things of that nature,
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then you build your design phase, logic model,
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physical model, start creating your database structure,
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so on and so on,
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do your testing, and then go on to acceptance.
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Now if you notice in this type of
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setup here that the customer
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doesn't really get their hands on
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the project until very very late in the project.
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In this case, let's see here what
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the dates are. Early March.
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This is obviously not a very large project
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here that's being scheduled,
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but they don't really get
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their hands on it until early March.
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Meanwhile, all of this work has been done
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between January and February in the Gantt chart.
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That's a true waterfall software development project
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and that's what we want to avoid.
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However, we're limited based
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on the company's culture, structure,
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government regulation,
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whatever the case might be so we want
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to have a version of a hybrid project.
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What we do is we keep the first couple
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of elements and then remove the rest.
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You'll see here that I've
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got my normal requirements
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gathering that's going to happen,
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then I'm going to build the generalized design model,
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what software I'm going to use,
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or what codebase I'm going to use,
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what platform or framework,
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whatever the case might be.
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But then I'm going to go into
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an iterative Agile-type development.
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I'm going to connect these and you'll
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notice how that pushes everything out,
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and I'll connect this one to sprint 2.
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What we see here is I've got a true product backlog,
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and then I've got several sprints.
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I'm going to make sprint 1 dependent upon
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the backlog and then sprint 2 dependent upon sprint 1.
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This not going to do it right now,
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but you'll notice that what actually should happen
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is this new software, I haven't used it before.
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I'm not sure why it's not playing nice.
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Anyway, the idea is
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that I'm doing my requirements gathering,
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I'm doing all the normal planning thing,
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I go to procurement,
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I go get my money,
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whatever the case might be,
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and then I'm starting to add items to my overall backlog.
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This is going to be your detailed backlog,
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the same way that you saw it in DevOps.
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The only difference is here that it's building the list,
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but it's not actually extending the projects.
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I don't want to relate these items to each other,
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I want to actually relate the sprints to each
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other so that the dependencies
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are on the sprints themselves.
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Again, I don't really know why that's not
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working the way that I want it to.
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But if you look at the chart here,
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this is what I'm trying to get at.
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I have an overall product backlog,
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and then I have these time-box sprints that drill down,
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and then at the end of my last sprint then
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my customer is going to accept the final product.
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Again, this could go on for years.
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But what I'm doing in essence is the same type of
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execution strategy as the earlier DevOps example,
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except I'm still using my normal Gantt chart schedule.
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I've got all my normal planning independency process,
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and then when the time comes to plan for sprint 1 in
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the same way that we were going to do
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it in the previous video,
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I should be able to do it.
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Then in sprint 1,
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I want to be able to add my to-do item.
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It crashed on me.
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Well, I don't have a good backup software.
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Microsoft Project doesn't offer a Mac version,
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but the basic idea behind it is
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that I'm going to set up my structure in
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such a way that I can take those items from the backlog.
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Let me get another one set up here.
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I've got my sprint.
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It's really crashing. Well,
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note to self, Microsoft Project Office
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is not the best way to do it.
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But I have my Sprint setup,
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I do all my initial planning,
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I build out my requirements,
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I build out my overall design plan,
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and then once I get into the execution phase,
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instead of doing the normal database structure then UI,
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all that stuff,
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I'm actually going ahead
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and building that product backlog,
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and then when the time comes to plan sprint 1,
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I move those items from
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the backlog in this sprint 1 and sprint 2 and so on.
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The important part about it is really
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more about how the schedule gets developed.
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It's the idea that we are doing requirements gathering.
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Each of those product backlog items should have
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an associated requirement that
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they ''live under'' that they're supporting.
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Once we get to the execution phase of the project,
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we're building it the same way
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that you would an Agile project.
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But the difference is no new requirements can come
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into the project without there
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being a traditional change control process.
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If I've got, say,
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50 requirements for the project and
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somebody wants to add a 51st requirement,
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I go through traditional change control.
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At the execution level,
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all I'm really doing is marrying
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features to those requirements.
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But if the feature doesn't marry
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to the requirement then it doesn't count.
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That's the key there,
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is that the change control process is
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there in order to make sure that your scope
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doesn't increase
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dramatically because your procurement and
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your structure is set up in such a way
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that is more of a traditional waterfall style.
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This is like I said, it's a good beginning step.
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It's a good entry-level
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into Agile project management
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from a traditional waterfall standpoint,
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and it tends to keep
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government agencies and large corporations.
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They tend to buy off on it a
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little bit more than they would
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for a full-blown changeover from waterfall to Agile.
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That completes this particular lesson.
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I hope everybody has a great day and I
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will see you in Module 5.
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