Single Sign-on and Federated Identity Management

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Time
12 hours 57 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
13
Video Transcription
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>> We're going to talk about
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single sign-on and federated identity management.
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These are important authorization concepts to
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understand when it comes
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to managing access in Cloud-based environments,
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especially in the context of development.
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In this lesson, we're going to talk about
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the use of single sign-on,
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we'll talk about the use cases for
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federated identity management and
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then also talk about the benefits
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and limitations of each.
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Overall, both techniques are used to provide
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authorization across or within
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devices within the platform or
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within a group of organizations.
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One of the problems that comes with
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added security is that it becomes cumbersome
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to the user or someone who's
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working within a Cloud-based platform to continually
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have to go through the IAM process for
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every different application or server they access.
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Although it's very secure,
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it impedes the operational efficiency in
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the real business case for
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having many of these items in the first place.
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Thankfully, there is a solution,
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single sign-on is used typically to
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the means of one authentication server or service
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to authenticate a user across all the applications
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or websites typically within one organization.
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Now as you can expect,
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although this saves a lot of time in terms of
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the user continually had to
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identify themselves and authenticate it.
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It increases security risks.
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>> If a user's credentials were compromised,
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>> those same credentials can be used
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>> to authenticate across
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>> a whole organization suite of applications and servers.
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Now, the important thing to think about is that, well,
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that means we had to have stricter IAM process.
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We've talked about the
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>> use of multi-factor authentication
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>> as another control that can be put in place to
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further strengthen and mitigate
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the risks that a user's credentials become compromised.
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Federated identity management is
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really taking that single sign-on notion of
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identity management and pushing
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it out between multiple organizations.
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There is two different distinct roles
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within federated identity management,
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the identity provider and then the service provider.
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The organizations themselves is
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the acting as the identity provider.
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They are authenticating the user,
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based on their credentials that they
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are in fact authenticated user,
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and then the trust that exists between
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that entity provider and the service providers,
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what enables multiple different organizations to share
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their credential or share
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user access rights amongst them.
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Now, with that trust comes great responsibility.
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You really had to do due diligence through
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third-party vetting that the organizations that you're
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trusting either to accept
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your user's authenticated credentials or if you are
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accepting their users authenticated credentials,
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that they have adequate policies and procedures and
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controls in place to
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monitor those credentials for compromise.
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Because in a federated system,
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you're not only getting access to
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potentially assets within one organization,
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you're getting assets of
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the data and processing within multiple organizations.
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That expands the scope and
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many famous breaches have occurred through
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third parties being vulnerable,
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not necessarily through a failure
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in federated authentication,
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but whenever there's reliance on
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third party and you can't think about
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or analyze their controls or get
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access to their system to audit it,
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that increases the risk that
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comes with relying on that third party.
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All right, quiz question. Trust between which
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parties makes federated identity management possible?
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Between identity providers, between service providers,
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or between the identity provider
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and the service provider.
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If you said between the identity provider and
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the service provider, that's correct.
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Now, in the theoretical contexts,
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either organization could be
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the identity provider or the service provider.
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It's really the trust between those two in
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those various roles that makes federated identity work,
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that enables multiple organizations to accept
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the authentication of one user to grant
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access across the different organizations.
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In summary, we talked about the use of single sign-on.
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We talked about the use of federated identity management.
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Both are decreasing the need
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to identify and authenticate,
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basically the IAM burden that comes
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with users using cloud-based systems.
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Now, reducing that burden by
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allowing one authorization to count and be
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mutually accepted by multiple systems
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or multiple organizations is great for
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improving operational efficiency and
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decreasing the burden of
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individuals login over and over again.
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But it comes with increased security concerns
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within an organization,
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as well as increased security when it
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comes to the trust between multiple organizations.
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You'll have to rely on your own security controls
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potentially in the SSOs situation,
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implementing multi-factor authentication or having
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really extensive vendor risk management when it
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comes to federated identity using third parties.
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All right, I'll see you in the next lesson.
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