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Networking Concepts Part 1

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Time
8 hours 19 minutes
Difficulty
Beginner
CEU/CPE
8
Video Transcription
00:01
our first module is going to begin with networking concepts, and here's what we're going to lay out the basics, make sure everybody understands the terms. We're going to use a networking and just answer questions about what it takes to make a network function.
00:15
So let's take a look at the objectives.
00:18
We're going to talk about the basics, and here's what we'll define those terms that we here and take for granted.
00:24
For example, the OSI reference model a framework, a node, a host of protocol and port.
00:32
And even though these may seem like very basic terms as you're getting into networking, you want to make sure you have a strong understanding of them.
00:41
As I mentioned,
00:42
the OSI reference model isn't something people just know automatically, and it's a really important foundational idea as it applies to networking.
00:51
So we'll talk about what it is to have a framework and what the purpose of that framework is.
00:56
We'll be looking at two frameworks. The OSI Reference model and the TCP I P model.
01:02
These will help us understand networking at a bit of a deeper level.
01:07
Then we'll move on to protocols and ports.
01:10
Protocols are necessary in order to enable communication between hosts.
01:15
They're basically a set of rules and regulations about how that communication is going to happen. So it's important to look at some of the more common protocols
01:23
some of those you may have heard of and some Maybe Now
01:26
we'll also take a look at an upper level of network services, D, H, C, P and DNS. We'll get into what some of these ideas are on a much deeper level as we move forward in the course. But to start, we just want to lay out the groundwork.
01:41
We'll also talk about storage and our data and where it lives, so to speak.
01:45
We can have storage on the network. We can have storage in the cloud. You can have storage on a different network, and we'll look at some of those options.
01:53
And then we're going to wrap up this section with remote access.
01:56
Most of what we'll talk about in the class is going to reference your physically connected to a local area network. But in the case of remote access, you might be connecting from a VPN or some other external source.
02:07
So how that works and the materials, equipment and tools we need to make that operate will all be covered in this section.
02:16
Okay, so jumping into network basics,
02:20
the first question we have to ask is, What is a network?
02:23
We take some of these things for granted, but I just want to be clear when we talk about a network. We're looking at a group of interconnected systems, and usually they're connected together for the purpose of sharing,
02:36
sharing data or sharing resources like maybe a printer or some other tools on the network.
02:42
So it's all about bringing these systems together and allowing them to access some of the same resources.
02:49
In order to do that, we have to have the systems themselves, a framework that provides the structure for how we're going to communicate and the clients and the servers that both need operating systems.
03:00
We'll have to think about protocols and how the data like media, will traverse the network.
03:05
The easy answer for media is cable,
03:07
but we have to think about the airwaves to because of wireless connectivity.
03:12
Then we have our network connectivity devices like our hubs, switches and routers.
03:16
Then we have network services that put it all together and make it work.
03:23
Starting out. The first thing to define after defining the network is a system.
03:29
When we talk about a system, there are different elements working together for a common goal,
03:32
which is a very broad definition.
03:36
You can see I have a bit more of an in depth definition on the side,
03:38
interconnected components which transform store transport or controlled data and our information for a particular purpose.
03:47
I don't like to read definitions for you as I know you can read for yourselves, but if you think about that, systems is a very inclusive term.
03:55
We've even got different types of systems.
03:59
Honestly, I don't want you to worry too much about someone saying node versus host or host versus client is. A lot of these terms are used interchangeably.
04:08
For instance, if you look at node, it's defined as any addressable device on the network. So that's your laptops or desktop computers. But it's also your router storage devices or network attached. Storage device is a cluster or all of these things.
04:24
If you can address it or access it on the network, it's a node.
04:28
A host is a type of note, and that generally indicates a computer system.
04:32
Types of hosts, our servers or clients.
04:35
Servers are computer systems, generally speaking, that provide a service like data or access to a printer. Any sort of service on the network, like DNS and the clients are the ones that access the resources of that server.
04:49
So
04:50
you can see there's not a huge difference between these terms and people say node or host,
04:56
but for the most part were generally just referring to network devices,
05:01
the one you will hear that we do usually make a discrepancy with his clients and servers.
05:06
Think of clients for the most part as end user workstations. When you're sitting at your desk and think of server as where you log on to the domain Access DNS or your database or file server,
05:20
what makes a network and network is often the operating system. I can have 15 client computers connected and running Windows 10, and I have a network, but I have what we used to call back in the olden days, or else my son says anything prior to 2010,
05:34
a peer to peer network.
05:36
We didn't have a formal domain environment. We just had a group of connected computers.
05:43
We can do that with a client based operating system,
05:46
and those will be what you're most familiar with
05:48
when I say client based operating system. I'm talking about Windows 10 Red Hat for Line X, basically just the client operating systems.
05:58
When we move to a client server environment where we need a domain, our realm created and we want centralized control, central login and Central Security to have a true network environment that we see in the workplace, we need at least one
06:11
but likely multiple servers running a network operating system. And that network operating system might be the latest version of Windows Server 2016 or 2020 UNIX or Oracle Solaris.
06:23
Back in the day we had Novell, which is even in the older days for me. But those are all network based operating systems.
06:30
Ultimately with your network based operating systems, they create this kind of virtual logical grouping of computers and clients that come on to the network and access the authentication server, which allows them onto the network.
06:44
Usually that authentication server passes out, policy manages access requirements to join the network and validates credentials.
06:53
So the environments were going to be working in today and focusing on throughout the class. Our domain based environments.
07:00
You'll have client operating systems and you'll have a server that's the domain controller that's running the network operating system.
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