Time
14 hours 13 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
20

Video Description

Introduction to Network Standard Switches This lesson discusses network standard switches and offers a breakdown of what will be covered in the module:

  • Defining virtual network
  • Describing virtual switch
  • Detecting virtual switch connection types
  • Describe components of a virtual switch
  • Creating a vNetwork standard switch

Video Transcription

00:04
Well, this is Dean Pompilio. Welcome to Cyber Eri.
00:07
This is Module five. Lesson one
00:10
for the virtual ization installation configuration of management class. And this lesson will be talking about an introduction to network standards, switches, virtual network standards, which is
00:24
so we'll define what the virtual network wouldn't. What it is,
00:27
what the virtual switch actually is.
00:30
The different connection types that are available for a virtual switch,
00:34
some of its components
00:36
and then in the lab you'll actually get to create a switch.
00:41
So starting with the virtual switch itself, we can see
00:45
that we've got several viens here.
00:48
Each of them has their virtual network interface card,
00:52
Virtual Nick,
00:54
and each of the virtual nix is connected to a port group.
00:59
I've got
01:00
reports defined for pork grouping production, another one named Test,
01:03
Other one named the Motion.
01:07
And there's a lot of flexibility for how you design your virtual switch.
01:15
These particular ports are the colored in red, are VM Colonel ports
01:21
and we need them colonel ports for various things.
01:23
For instance, your management network might be connected to one.
01:27
I might have another one designated for the motion, another one designated for I scuzzy or fault tolerance traffic,
01:34
and we'll get to look at that little bit later.
01:38
So these are special port types
01:40
that are that are used for things other than regular
01:44
host of B M R V M D V M network. In traffic
01:51
when I defined, or when you define a virtual switch, you need to create
01:56
coupling ports. If you want this switch to communicate with the outside network,
02:01
you don't always need up ling ports.
02:04
I could create several virtual switches and allow the networking to take place within the host.
02:09
So in that case, I don't need an up link port. But if you want to connect
02:14
to your external network external to the host itself,
02:16
then you need an up link.
02:19
So those get to find when you build the switch
02:23
and their given names like what we see here for our physical next bm nix
02:28
zero vm nick one.
02:30
So those are Those are host network interface cards that are on the physical host.
02:37
We can also support
02:38
villains
02:39
within our virtual switch.
02:43
So if I connect my coupling ports from the back of the host to a physical switch, I can define villains I can have one for my management traffic
02:53
and maybe one for I p storage.
02:55
The lands are very useful
02:57
because they give you the ability to use a physical network but separated with separate logical networks.
03:05
Um, one of the caveats or little gotchas with using bee lands is that your physical switch must be in trunk mode in order to route this traffic properly
03:15
so you can't just enable V lands
03:19
in your switch configuration. Then expect that the traffic is going to go somewhere outside of your host without making the corresponding changes to the physical network.
03:27
Keep that in mind
03:29
if you do use the lands a tow to die. One Q B Land tagging is this current standard that supported,
03:36
which is ah, you know, modern modern standard in that case.
03:40
So I talked about our different connection types
03:44
and some of the pieces that are inside the switch.
03:46
Now we can have a look at the components,
03:51
so if we go to your host and click the configuration tab,
03:55
you have the hardware and software suction in the hardware section. We're interested in the networking link.
04:00
If I click the networking link, then I get a visual display off my switch
04:08
and you can see this a very simple switch. I've got ah VM pork group
04:12
with a pork group name Of'em Network,
04:15
which is pretty typical for what you'll see in the lab.
04:17
And then I also have some of'em colonel ports defined in my poor group named Management Network.
04:26
And when you look at your virtual switch, you can see the way that they're connected visually within the within the switch. This is basically the same as this.
04:34
It's just showing it a different representation.
04:36
And then, if I have up links to find, then I'll see a little network adapter card icon, the name of that physical adapter,
04:45
the M zero. And then it's speed and duplex settings, So I know it's BMX zero. I know it's
04:50
it's a gigabit speeds full duplex.
04:56
If you click the Properties link just above the switch,
04:59
you could bring up the properties to look a little bit further at some of the settings you can change. For instance, I can define the number of ports
05:06
anywhere from 24 reports up to 40 88
05:11
and it might seem a little strange that these air, not powers of two. You'd expect to see something like
05:15
32 ports all the way up to 40 96
05:19
and the reason for that is that eight ports are reserved for VM colonel.
05:26
So that way, we if we used all 40 88 available ports,
05:31
we still have the eight reserved
05:33
to give us the total of 40 96.
05:36
So just keep that in mind. That's why those numbers look a little strange. The default is usually 120 ports when you create a switch, and that's plenty for most purposes.
05:46
If you click the tab next to the ports, you can click network adapters
05:53
and this tab. We can add or remove physical network adapters from this virtual switch,
06:00
and sometimes that's necessary. You might configure a switch with two up ling ports, and then later you decide that you need
06:08
one of those adapters for another switch or for another host
06:11
another host. But another switch that's going to be communicating with your V EMS so you can remove one of these and then add it to another switch.
06:20
And if you go to the configuration, then you'd CVM nick one attached to this, which as you as you configure it
06:29
all right. So Lab five would be your next lab and this lab. You'll be looking at the standard switch configuration that's that's built when you could create the host
06:39
and you'll create the switch with a B M port group.
06:43
There were similar what we see here,
06:45
Emmanuel, add your virtual machine to that poor group
06:48
by following the are by just basically going to the properties of the settings of that B M
06:56
going to the network adapter and selecting the VM network from the dropdown.

Up Next

Virtualization Management

Our self-paced online Virtualization Management training class focuses on installing, configuring and managing virtualization software. You?ll learn how to work your way around the cloud and how to build the infrastructure for it.

Instructed By

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Dean Pompilio
CEO of SteppingStone Solutions
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