Time
41 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
1

Video Transcription

00:00
Hello. My name is Dustin, and welcome to networking. I P. Addressing
00:05
every machine on a network has a unique identify rhe called an I P address. This address allows your device to communicate with other devices on the network that also have an I P. Address.
00:16
So you can think about it like your house address. If you wanted to send mail to someone else, you need to know the address. This ended two on the letter. You print your address so the recipient knows who to respond to.
00:28
This is kind of a real basic example of how I p addressing works.
00:34
There are two current versions of the I P addressing being used today.
00:39
I p v six was created to help with the increasing issue of running out of I P addresses in the I p. The four realm
00:48
in a common home network I p addresses Air said dynamically using d h C P. But you can also SME annually set your I P address.
00:58
I P addresses can be broken down into a network address and a host address.
01:03
In the example On the screen, we've got an I P address of 192.168 dot 0.11 slash 24 which is a common Class C I P address, and we'll get into this a little later in the lesson. But we know this is the host address
01:19
so we can use the subnet mask or, in this case, um, cider notation
01:23
to determine the network address.
01:26
So the network address in this case would be 1921 16.0 dot zero, or marm, or commonly referred to as the 192.168 dot zero network.
01:42
So I p V four in I p. Before there are public addresses and private addresses,
01:48
public addresses are addresses that are row double on the Internet.
01:52
Private I P addresses are not.
01:55
So I paid before uses 32 bits to create a unique address on the network. Each section separated a duck by a dot, like we saw in the previous example.
02:05
Each section is called it octet.
02:08
An octet is a decimal representation for an eight digit binary number
02:15
in I P V four. There are three private class ranges that are reserved for internal network. Addressing
02:22
a Class A I P address range is 10.0 dot 0.0 through 10 dot to 55.2 55.2 55.
02:36
In a Class A network, there can be 16 million, 777,216 host addresses.
02:46
Class
02:47
Be addresses are between 172.1 16.0 dot zero through 172.31 dot 55.2 55
03:01
in a Class B network, and there can be 1,048,576 hosts.
03:09
Classy private networks are probably the most common that you encounter for, like your Home Network, and they air between the 192168.0 dot zero address through 192.168 dot 255.255
03:28
So in a Class C private network, you can have 65,536 hosts
03:35
because I P p four uses 32 a bit address 32 bit addresses and we have so many devices connected to the Internet now were actually running out of I P B four addresses
03:46
to combat this issue I p v. Six was created.
03:52
I. P v six uses 128 bit addresses, which is much more than I B I. P v four is able to use.
03:59
Because these addresses have much Maur bit space, they can accommodate a much larger number of hosts.
04:06
I. P v six addresses contain eight groups of Hexi decimal numbers.
04:11
Because these addresses are so long, you can admit groups of all zeros by representing them as two Coghlan's, as shown in the example here.
04:20
And I'm not gonna read that out, but you can see in the middle from the CBD A. You've got a bunch of zeros,
04:27
and you can also refer to that
04:30
as the same thing down below. So just the two Coghlan's represent all those zeroes.

Up Next

Networking Fundamentals for Security Practitioners

In this course, you will learn the fundamentals of networking through the lens of a security practitioner. More specifically, we will cover topics like network protocols, architecture, devices, and topology, which are vital for any entry level IT/Security professional.

Instructed By

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Dustin Parry
Network Security Engineer
Instructor