Investigation Bias

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Time
1 hour 49 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
2
Video Transcription
00:00
module 3.2 or less than 3.2
00:04
is talking about investigation bias
00:08
because we're following a scientific process.
00:11
But because we're also human,
00:14
there are often times where we will make a preconception, as we talked about, an expert can put aside their preconceptions, but
00:23
you have tow. Have a new awareness
00:25
of the biases that you might have in order to
00:30
understand and fully appreciate
00:33
how to set aside your biases.
00:38
In this video,
00:39
we're going to talk about how to recognize and address Biasi in the investigative process.
00:46
So let's start off. What is bias
00:49
Bias is a disproportionate weight in favor of or against annoy, idea or thing, usually in a way that is closed minded, prejudicial or unfair.
01:00
As forensic examiners, we definitely don't want to
01:03
come in with a preconceived notion off what the outcome of a case is going to be,
01:10
and it's hard to dio. It's not an easy thing to Dio.
01:12
It takes a lot of practice, but what makes great experts are they're able to look at the evidence and not rush to judgment.
01:23
There are
01:25
four really common
01:26
forms of bias.
01:29
Inherent bias, unconscious bias, confirmation, bias and halo or horn bias.
01:36
Inherent bias is everything we do everything that we look at. We've got an inherent bias.
01:42
You're gonna have biases based on your experience.
01:46
You're going to find something you're going to
01:51
by virtue of being a forensic examiner. Perhaps
01:55
you're have an inherent bias e for or against your,
02:01
um,
02:02
the suspect in the cakes.
02:06
And you're gonna have an inherent bias See towards your client
02:09
the client that's hired you.
02:10
You want to either prove that they did or didn't dio that the suspect did or didn't dio what was what they're being accused off
02:20
unconscious bias. This is really a tough one on one that's actually quite fascinating to me,
02:25
but it's the idea of unconscious bias. It's the idea that sometimes we have biases. We don't even realize
02:31
we have
02:34
we.
02:35
And oftentimes those unconscious biases are one of the two biases were about to talk about confirmation. Bias is where
02:44
we are biased towards
02:46
confirming a set of facts or set of ideas that we believe to be true.
02:53
The facts that are given to us by our clients
02:55
are
02:57
bias. Our inclination is to try to confirm that those air. In fact, true
03:02
whether or not and to the exclusion off other biases
03:08
and also halo or horn the idea that you're automatically bias predisposed toe either thinking that all people are good or all people are bad.
03:20
All people are guilty.
03:22
All people are innocent,
03:23
and in our
03:27
this is different from the idea of innocent until proven guilty.
03:31
But it's the idea that your bias see that you could be biased
03:38
towards just towards either believing that everybody is good or everyone is bad, that everyone is innocents or everyone is guilty.
03:49
And
03:50
the idea that
03:52
you're going to find evidence that's going to either prove or disprove
03:57
your inherent your built in your unconscious bias.
04:02
What are the dangers of biases?
04:05
Well, they can lead to self fulfilling conclusions,
04:10
that confirmation, bias, that bias, that I'm gonna prove
04:14
what I what I need to prove, and I'm gonna do it come hell or high water.
04:18
So you open yourself up to creating conclusions that air self fulfilling where you find the evidence and you're you only look at the evidence in a way that
04:30
identifies it and makes it
04:32
self fulfilling to you or to your client
04:36
biases can also lead to a misinterpretation of evidence.
04:41
You might find that the evidence says that the individual
04:46
had a proclivity for looking at pornographic material.
04:51
But because you've met the person
04:55
because you or because you have a
04:57
halo or halo or horn Biasi,
05:00
you might say that can't be. This person wouldn't do it
05:03
there. Are there the pastor of the church,
05:06
They're the rabbi at a synagogue.
05:09
There's no way
05:11
your bias he has led you to misinterpret the evidence.
05:15
The other problem is that you might improperly discount evidence.
05:19
Well, this person would never do this. This person would never do that. So
05:26
we got to just believe that this evidence isn't telling us the truth.
05:30
The evidence is the evidence, the fax or the fax. And it's important that we set aside our biases and that we look at the fax
05:36
through clear lens and say, Is this reasonable?
05:42
Does Could this explain what it's meant to explain? And of course, there's gonna be caveats. Of course, there's gonna be
05:51
couching of your conclusions off course. There's going to be some element where you're going to say it could be this, but it also could be this,
06:01
and that's not improperly discounting evidence or misinterpreting or building self fulfilling conclusions.
06:09
It's just the case that
06:10
something maybe one thing or the other or multiple multitude of different things.
06:16
So it's important to not improperly discount evidence
06:21
because that may lead to
06:24
misinform during correct
06:26
conclusions or opinions.
06:29
In this video, we talked about how to recognize and address biases in the investigative process.
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