Identification of Threats

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Time
7 hours 56 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
8
Video Transcription
00:01
Lesson 4.3 Identification off threats
00:08
In this lesson,
00:09
we'll cover what traits are,
00:12
and we'll go over a few examples of threats.
00:19
So what are threats?
00:23
These can be man made,
00:25
intentional or accidental,
00:28
natural or environmental in nature.
00:31
Threats are a specific type of event or action performed that could result in damage to assets.
00:38
For most threats to occur, there would also need to be a vulnerability present, which we will discuss in the next section.
00:46
One of the easiest ways to come up with threads is search for some free guides online with the most common ones
00:53
I sold, 27,000 and five gives a table of some of the most common threats.
00:59
The most important thing to do during your threat identification is to list all possible threats that could happen to your organization,
01:06
regardless of any controls that may or may not already exist.
01:11
You want to be as open minded as possible to ensure you go through as many possible adverse scenarios as you can.
01:18
But, for example,
01:19
if your organization is in a desert and the threat list that you're working off suggests blizzard or ice or snow storm as a potential threat
01:30
that probably doesn't need to go on your threat list, given the environment that you are based in.
01:34
But something like fire is always a threat, even if you have controls in place
01:40
and should always form a part of the threat list. Regardless of its current likelihood,
01:46
you want to be able to assess where you currently stand against these streets and accurately determined your key areas of weakness and likelihood for risk to materialize.
01:57
With regards to human threats,
01:59
it is useful to put them into buckets of threat actors.
02:02
These buckets can include groups like hackers,
02:07
nation states, terrorists, disgruntled employees, activists, etcetera.
02:13
It's a largely to assess each of these types of actors in terms of their motivation,
02:17
to get your organisation's assets
02:20
as well as the capability of the great actors.
02:23
You should obviously keep the ones that are both very capable and motivated at the top of mind for the next steps in the risk management process.
02:36
There are multiple threat modern methodologies out there, so choose best one that works for your organization.
02:49
So as we mentioned briefly on the previous slide,
02:52
here are some of the common threat actor bucket groups
02:57
having a list to start off with and make the process easier to think off other potential threat actors, which are unique to your organization.
03:06
For each of these buckets,
03:07
we need to look at the capability as well as the motivation off these threat actors in relation to your organization.
03:15
If you're a corner store bakery, a terrorist organization is probably not going to be very motivated to target you.
03:23
But if you're a government department or even a critical infrastructure organization to your country,
03:30
you'd probably be a lot higher on the target list for a terrorist group.
03:36
Capability Off a Thread actor is how technically capable they are to gain access to information and sits,
03:42
especially those stored and transmitted in Elektronik formats.
03:47
A criminal syndicate, for example, would typically be very capable, as they often have large financial backing for their operations, and they are able to recruit very skilled hackers.
04:00
A general user, on the other hand, is probably not as technical,
04:03
technically capable,
04:04
especially with regards to advanced hacking techniques.
04:10
Motivation is where you determine or estimate how motivated an attacker would be to try and get your information.
04:16
In other words, How badly do they want it?
04:23
The easiest is to assess
04:25
capability and motivation on a scale of 1 to 5.
04:30
There are resource is available online
04:32
to help you give definition
04:34
to what each of these levels meaning.
04:38
Basically, level five is the most capable and most highly motivated,
04:44
while Level one would be the least capable and least motivated.
04:48
Multiplying your motivation, by your capability
04:53
would give you the overall level off threat.
04:57
Putting this in the Matrix would allow you to plot these levels in terms off critical, very high medium low,
05:06
an insignificant, for example,
05:13
to summarize.
05:15
In this lesson, we covered what the threats are
05:17
and why they need to be considered during risk management.
05:21
We looked at examples of different types of threats and threat actors.
05:28
We also discussed capability and motivation and how this needs to be factored into your considerations. Iran Specific Threat Actors
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