Time
3 hours 55 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
4

Video Transcription

00:03
hello and welcome to lessen 5.3 daily stand up meetings and actually use the term daily
00:11
as a substitution for daily and or
00:15
weekly. Um,
00:18
because some projects don't really require daily meetings. It really kind of depends on the set up that you have. Um, although I will say, if you're meeting more often than
00:30
or less often than weekly
00:33
again, the argument is,
00:35
Are you really performing an agile project at that point?
00:39
Um, so
00:43
the main essence of what we're trying to get at is that there is a constant collaboration to agile projects that's different than waterfall based projects,
00:55
and
00:56
I'm going to use a personal story a little bit.
01:02
The point of agile
01:03
overall is really too
01:07
aggressively address the idea of sunk costs. So
01:14
in agile project management,
01:18
you want to try toe to prevent additional
01:23
funding of some costs. So every day is a new day or every week. In the case of you doing weekly meetings,
01:30
Um, and so my personal story is that
01:33
recently I had a, uh,
01:36
investment property in Virginia, and
01:40
it was costing me as pretty significant amount of money in order to pay the mortgage maintaining all that kind of stuff
01:49
I had renders renders moved out. We're looking at selling the property because I was in the military and station in Virginia, but now I live in Florida after I retired.
02:00
So it was not very cost effective for me to maintain property in Virginia.
02:06
In order to sell it, I had to put a new roof on the property and put new windows on the property, which was a significant investment,
02:14
Uh,
02:16
in order or based on the market value of the property.
02:22
I would
02:23
I would be lucky to get my investment back.
02:27
But if I didn't invest that money that I would not get any of my money back
02:34
where the sun costing comes into play. Here is the idea that
02:38
if I spend whatever, let's call it $10,000. If I spend $10,000 to sell the house and make $10,000
02:49
and my breaking even
02:51
well, not really, because
02:53
I have been paying the mortgage for all this period of time when there was no Renner in in the property, so I would be upside down in the long run.
03:04
So should I sell it for more money Should I try to eat? It is very complicated. I'm not trying toe air my grievances. But the point is, is that at a certain point you have to stay. Look,
03:16
in order to achieve your objective, you have to spend
03:22
X y Z amount of new money money that hasn't been spent yet.
03:28
If you spend the new money,
03:30
your r o I will be whatever it is,
03:35
it's human. Nature is very difficult to avoid
03:39
talking about all the other money that you had spent prior to that and why
03:46
somehow, magically, my property and Virginia was gonna be worth 25 or whatever $1000 more than what it was worth. So
03:55
sometimes not sometimes,
03:59
normally you have to
04:01
accept the fact that
04:04
the money it are even spent is gone. There's not coming back. It is what it is.
04:10
What agile does,
04:12
especially with the daily stand at meetings, is it? It forces that conversation
04:17
happen daily
04:20
or weekly in the case of a little bit less active project. But
04:28
we're trying to
04:31
cut our losses
04:33
as early in the project as we can, and that's where the stand up meetings really come into play, so their vital their vital, agile projects because it forces you to ask the question every day.
04:46
Is there value that that this project is bringing to the organization? And if there is not any value to the organization,
04:54
do mean to stop spending money on it, right? So there's other vital, um, toe agile projects. How do we orchestrate those meanings? What do we do in during those meetings it for doing them daily.
05:05
What's the point? I'm not a big fan of meeting, so I wanna have the lowest number of meetings that I could possibly participate in. That's just kind of my gig,
05:17
but they are really important. And part of that is the collaboration environment. So we get together every day and we have our daily meeting and and we collaborate as a team and we say, Hey, you know, What are you doing?
05:30
What are you doing? What am I doing? How are we again? How are we bringing value to the organization? I'm gonna do X y the things today in my sprint backlog
05:42
because they bring value to the organization.
05:46
So we get together, we collaborate, we problems all together. We assign work every day.
05:55
We want to try and figure out who's doing what and d compile that strategic objective
06:03
into manageable
06:05
chunks of work.
06:06
And ideally, that work is two and a single individual. So
06:14
I wake up tomorrow morning, I go to work. They say I needed Teoh build X Y and Z. I say, Okay, cool. And then I go and build it
06:21
in the following day. After that same thing happens over again, so I don't have to bring anything home. I don't have a lot of long term things that I have to worry about, because I'm
06:34
focusing daily on the tasks of that day that puts a little bit of pressure on the project manager because the project manager has to be thinking about
06:45
the entire sprint.
06:46
And that's really where the value of having a project manager comes into play with an agile project is because their primary role is to be
07:00
the roadblock eliminator, the challenge eliminator there, the person who is there to here
07:08
what you have to say, uh, or what you have to complain about, I guess who would be a better way to put it
07:14
and say, Okay, I I will take that on. I got that. You have a road block and I getting you 80 from so and so So I'm going to go address that.
07:24
So we address challenges. We say, Hey,
07:27
if I only had
07:30
X, Y and Z I get could get my work done.
07:33
That's the PM's role at that point is to go eliminate that X, Y and Z
07:39
Um,
07:41
additionally, we want to continually improve. So again, going back to that son cost analogy that I made earlier in the video
07:47
every day is an opportunity to eliminate some cost
07:53
that is a key ingredient
07:56
to Angela methodology.
07:58
So we meet daily, we say, Hey, look, I did this thing yesterday. It didn't add any value, so I didn't want to get rid of that, not do it again.
08:11
And then, of course, we're also tracking progress. So during the daily means you get the
08:16
opportunity to talk to the project manager and say, I thought this thing was going to be four units of work
08:22
is taking me all day. I underestimated it.
08:26
Help,
08:28
uh, or vice versa. I thought something was gonna be four years of work, but I gotta done very quickly. I would like more work. So the daily meetings in agile are really, really important because they give you the opportunity to cover all of these things
08:43
and really give you the chance to collaborate with your team on a daily basis
08:50
and
08:50
continually improve the process for the Remember at the end of the day, the goal of this whole thing is to bring value to the organization and improved team performance. So if you're not
09:03
looking at those hard things that you don't want to talk about,
09:07
then you're not doing your job in agile. And part of a good daily standard meeting is that you want to look at those hard things and my eyes productive. That can be. If not, why
09:18
am I doing what I
09:20
I said I was going to do? If not why? And the PM's rules? And they're you know, there's a lot of talk about a product manager not even being a
09:30
necessary job skill with an agile team,
09:33
I believe that's incorrect. I believe that the job of project manager is too
09:39
really focus on bringing everybody to the level of efficiency,
09:43
the highest level of efficiency if they could possibly be.
09:48
So that's the role of the daily stand up meeting.
09:52
So in today's video, we covered.

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