Time
8 hours 53 minutes
Difficulty
Beginner
CEU/CPE
11

Video Description

In this lesson you will learn how to, implement basic support concepts including but not limited to: Checking for external issues

  • Loose cables / connections
  • Power
  • Physical damage
  • Manufacturer documentation
  • Manufacturer websites
  • Technical community groups

Explain basic backup concepts - Importance of backups

  • Scheduling
  • Frequency
  • Storage mediums

    • Locally attached storage
    • Offsite/cloud-based
  • Start your computer in Safe Mode / Single-User Mode / Recovery Mode.

Start your computer in Safe Mode and locate System Recovery, Device Manager, Event Viewer, and System Information. Identify how you would recover the system, remove or update drivers, view events, and verify system information if necessary.

Check system configuration / startup items. - Linux: Review Xmodulo: How to Start a Program Automatically in Linux Desktop. Open the corresponding utility and check startup applications to verify only desired software is running automatically on your system.

  • Restore a file or files to verify the backup.
  • Schedule a system backup to run daily or weekly.
  • Research cloud backup alternatives.

Perform system maintenance. Clean your computer and peripherals. After cleaning, check for issues including loose cables and connections, power, and any physical damage. Over time, your computer and its peripherals accumulate contaminants like dust, dirt, hair, smoke residues, etc… If they aren't cleaned on a regular basis, these contaminants may block the ventilation and cause CPU and other components to heat up which can cause potential damage. Follow these tips to clean your computer and keep it running healthy and problem free.

always keep your computer clean, with all the dirt, grime and bacteria. Cleaning your keyboard will not only make sure it functions but it will keep it germ-free. To clean an optical or LED mouse, turn it over and dampen a lint-free cloth with rubbing alcohol and gently rub the upper and lower portion of the mouse. Clean any smudges around the lens area.

Video Transcription

00:01
Welcome back to Domain five, and this is now module 5.3,
00:07
where we look at implementing basic support concepts.
00:13
So in this module, we're going to look at
00:16
checking for external issues,
00:18
checking that you have power and your battery's working,
00:22
checking for physical damage.
00:24
And then we'll look at where you can get help, such as documentation that came with the product, websites and forums online and Internet searching,
00:34
and finally will look at getting technical support from the vendor that produced the equipment that you're having problems with.
00:44
So
00:45
sometimes problems with computers can be
00:49
complex, but sometimes it's very simple.
00:53
So I mentioned in an earlier module. Don't overlook the obvious on one of the most obvious things is, is your device actually getting any power?
01:03
So
01:03
check to see if there's any sign of life
01:07
on a desktop computer. For example, if it is getting power, that might be lights that come on all you might hear noises. When you try and turn it on, such as the fans or the hard drive's spinning up.
01:21
Make sure the computer's actually plugged in to the power socket on the wall.
01:25
Another possibility is that the power socket in the wall. It's not functioning, and you can easily test that by
01:33
plugging your device and then plugging in some simple device like a lamp and just see if the lab works.
01:40
If not, obviously, then the problem is with the socket and not with your computer.
01:47
What about battery powered devices? Well, if it is battery powered, check the following is your battery charged up
01:53
is the charge of working. For example, in many cases, with laptops, you have a little brick that you plug into the wall and it has a little light on it. So if it's working, the light comes on. And then when you plug the cable from that into your laptop, a little light on the laptop comes on
02:10
to make sure all of that is working and charging up the battery.
02:15
The other problem could be that the battery is not seated correctly within the device, so just take the cover off,
02:22
take out the battery and then put it back in again. You often will have it click into place when it's seated correctly.
02:30
Occasionally, devices will not operate if the cover is not on,
02:34
so make sure you have put the cover back on after doing anything with the battery.
02:42
Okay,
02:43
if there is no power even after you have charged the battery, it may simply be that the battery has reached the end of its useful life.
02:51
Um,
02:52
one thing to watch out forward batteries is also this. If they're getting unusually hot or swelling up,
03:00
then those batteries have become dangerous. At that point, they could, in some cases, explode or they could leak liquid all over your precious and expensive I T equipment.
03:14
So there isn't any
03:16
possibility that there's damage in the battery itself. It's a good idea to replace it rather than keep on trying to use it.
03:27
Check all the cables
03:29
as we've gone through this course, we have seen that there are so many different cables that have to be plugged into the back, particularly of a desktop computer.
03:37
You would have USB cables, maybe running two printers, scanners and so on. You have the video cable running to your display monitor.
03:45
You have the keyboard plugged in. You have the power cables, plug bean and so on.
03:51
Check all of the wires and connectors for damage.
03:53
If somebody, for example, is not very careful plugging in a B G a plug that has many pins sticking out of it. And if you haven't aligned it carefully, you could have bent one of the pins. So check for that kind of damage as well as any other obvious damage on the cables such as that is being bent sharply or the rubber coating is
04:13
broken. Was something like that.
04:15
Try removing and plugging the cable back in.
04:19
Sometimes you'll find that that will reset whatever device it is that was connected to the cable.
04:25
This'll may particularly be true of USB devices. Just try unplugging the USB cable and plugging it back in to see that,
04:32
then Love's communication.
04:36
If you do suspect a 40 cable, this is one of the easiest things to troubleshoot because you congest simply replace it with a known good one. That's a very good technique. Generally, when you're troubleshooting, computers doesn't just apply to cables. For example, if you think your network adapter card is 40 then you have another one.
04:55
Take up the one you think is faulty and put in one that you know works. Then see that fixes the problem.
05:00
So we can try that same technique with cables. So if you have spare power cables, USB cabled and so on,
05:08
simply swap them out for the one that you suspect might be faulty
05:16
computers, and particularly the hard disks within computers are sensitive to jolts and kicks and vibration on dust.
05:25
So check for any kind of physical damage to the device to indicate that it may have bean
05:30
hit or knocked over or dented or something like that. Just stop. Computers and laptops have vents where air is sucked in or blown out to keep the device cool.
05:42
Check that those events are not clogged with dust because that could lead to overheating and overheating often results in intermittent problems like
05:50
the computer works fine for an hour or so, but then it overheats and everything just shuts down or the system crashes.
05:58
The other place to check for dust is within a desktop computer Dusk. Also, Dust also collects
06:04
on all those fans.
06:06
Remember, there's a fine in the power supply that may be a fund for the
06:11
case itself.
06:12
There will be a fine over the CPU, and if you have ah, high end video adapter card that may have its own fine as well.
06:19
Make sure all of those fines are not covered in dust and where you have heat sinks like you do above the CPU.
06:26
Make sure that that's not filled with dust. You might need to vacuum the dust out
06:34
look for signs of physical damage. So as this we mentioned at the beginning of this slide, if there has been some kind of physical damage, then the internal components might have been damaged, and you might have to open up the case to see if any physical damage was done internally.
06:55
And if it's a new device, check the packaging to see if there is evidence off the packaging having bean broken, dented or crack.
07:02
It could mean that that
07:04
their damage was done to the device during shipment
07:08
on. You may be able to then, you know, claim against
07:12
the provider such as UPS, so we would deliver the parcels.
07:15
Um, I and you may be able to get a refund from the vendor who so I sent you the device
07:26
check manufacturers documentation.
07:30
It used to be a few years ago that all these devices computing devices came with extensive documentation off on thick volumes
07:38
in order to save money these days, and I guess, save paper as well in trees
07:43
these days. What, then does often do is they shipped the manual on a CD that's enclosed with the product,
07:48
and the actual printed paper. Documentation is pretty scant, simply just the steps to set up the device and nothing much more than that.
07:58
And where there is such documentation, make sure you have actually followed all the steps meticulously that they indicate for setting up the device.
08:09
And if you do have manuals whether they're in digital form on the CD or physical books, have a look at the back of the end off that manual because there's usually a troubleshooting section where it gives you certain common symptoms and ways of resolving those problems.
08:30
You can also go check on the manufacturer's website.
08:33
Most vendors provide support documentation, all forums or
08:39
epoch use frequently asked question pages
08:43
on their website.
08:45
Just be careful when you read through these that you are actually reading the details about the particular model of device you have. Sometimes it gets a little confusing on these websites because they're tryingto,
08:56
um
08:58
provide information that applies to a variety of different models.
09:01
Or sometimes they have information about a similar model, but not exactly the same model that you have,
09:09
so just make sure you are reading the right documentation.
09:13
You can also search on the Internet. If you're not sure how to get to the vendors, are support
09:20
pages on the Internet.
09:22
Just search for it. So, for example, if you have a DEL product,
09:24
just search on the Internet for Del support,
09:28
and then you will usually find a link to the support pages provided by that particular vendor.
09:35
So what do you normally find there? While you may find digital copies off the manuals for the device often much more extensive than what actually came with the device, and typically these manuals are in PdF format so you can download them and read through them on your local machine.
09:54
They're usually also have an F A Q page frequently asked questions page, and you may find that your problem is one that is fairly common, and it's already listed there, and the solution is listed there.
10:07
Some vendors provide diagnostic utilities, for example, Del
10:13
you can go to Dell's website and diet, download diagnostic utilities, which you can then copy onto a CD or a USB flash drive and then use that to troubleshoot the computer.
10:24
The other thing to look for these support websites is if there are any updated drivers or utilities that may have come with the device,
10:35
so there may be updated versions of those utilities. Onda may be updated drivers, so generally it's a good practice to ensure when you're troubleshooting that you do have the latest version of any software utilities that came with the device,
10:48
as well as the latest version of any drivers that are provided by the vendor.
10:56
Some websites have an online chat facility where you can basically instant message with the support technician.
11:05
One big benefit of this is that usually this is much faster than getting telephone support.
11:09
Generally, the wait time for a new online chat is with a few minutes, and sometimes you know it's almost instant, whereas the wait time, if you actually call up a support number on the phone
11:22
might be 30 minutes 40 minutes or longer.
11:31
Benders often provide online forums where their customers can discuss problems and solutions. Just be aware if you're reading through those that you're not reading advice from
11:41
technicians, you're not reading advice from people who are experts in the product.
11:46
You're actually reading the advice of other customers who may have encountered the same problems as you
11:52
and may have actually figured out what the solution is. In fact, some of them may have done all the research that you would otherwise have to do and have just posted up, very helpfully, the solution they found that actually work
12:07
apart from the ones provided by the vendors. There are many independent I T forums on the Internet.
12:13
So again you can simply go search on the Internet for I T forums, and you'll probably get a list of hundreds and hundreds of them scroll through and see which ones you think might be of interest and check those out.
12:30
And then, of course, there is simply just Google of your problem.
12:33
Now Google has actually entered the English language as a verb as a Google it.
12:39
But of course, Google. It's just a search engine,
12:43
and there are many other search engines. So I'm not necessarily recommending Google as opposed to any other search engine. There's some very interesting search engines out there, such as the cochlea.
12:54
Which
12:54
promises, too?
12:56
Yeah,
12:58
Jet. I'm not sure how they generate income, but promises to plant trees. And every time you go search through them, you're helping to contribute to plant trees.
13:07
Um, then there's duck. Duck Go.
13:11
That one is useful. If you're concerned about privacy,
13:15
As you know, some search engines like Google on Dhe, Microsoft's being search engine and Yahoo,
13:22
they actually record all your searches and use that to figure out how to advertise things to you and so on. It's kind of like a little bit like spyware.
13:31
So what, Duck duck, Go promises is that all your data is anonymous and not saved when you're doing searches on the Internet. In any case,
13:41
the whole point about this is is whatever you search engine you like to use, go search for help,
13:48
and many times what you will find useful is this. If you see an actual air a message, write it down word for word
13:56
and then search for that word for word within your search engine, and you will often find websites
14:03
where people are discussing that particular problem in that particular error message.
14:07
Sometimes there are messages include error codes, so it's worth writing those down as well and searching for those. For example, if you
14:16
get a Windows blue screen of death,
14:20
that is when the system crashes and you got a blue screen with an error message appearing.
14:24
You can write down the code of the error message and then search for that
14:28
to see. This is a problem that is common. And if there's a known solution for it,
14:37
Uh,
14:37
if you do do this, if you're reading discussion forums where people are discussing problems
14:43
again, just be a little bit wary. These are not necessarily technicians who are providing the advice. These are not necessarily experts in that particular product or field in which you're searching.
14:56
So sometimes there's lots of helpful amateurs who are contributing,
15:01
and sometimes what they're contributing is misleading information because they haven't really understood the problem or they haven't really understood the solution.
15:09
So always read this with a slight air of skepticism
15:13
and also read the entire thread.
15:16
You will see this happening fairly frequently that somebody posts up a problem.
15:22
Somebody immediately comes back with a possible solution or explanation
15:26
and then have you read further down the thread? You see other people coming on and saying, No, that response was not right.
15:33
So it's a good idea to just scan through the entire thread off discussion rather than just act on the first suggestion that you see within the discussion.
15:46
Contacting technical support by the vendor
15:50
surrenders will often provide technical assistance for their products, but sometimes that's time limited. So it may be that they only provide their free support for a month or three months or six months after you buy the
16:03
by the product.
16:06
Gather as much information as you can before calling technical support, and that will save you a lot of time when you get on there. So make sure you know the make and model of the particular device that you are having problems with. Or, if it's a piece of software, make sure you know the version number that you're using. For example, if I was looking for help with office,
16:26
there are multiple versions of office. There's Office 10
16:30
office, 16 office 365 and so on,
16:34
so it would be useful for the support technician you get through to know which exact version of the software you are
16:42
using
16:44
on with hardware. Make sure you know the make and model that you're using.
16:48
The other pertinent information that may want from you is what is the operating system running
16:52
on your computer, and any version numbers off the operating system as well.
16:59
If you've tried
17:00
some troubleshooting already,
17:03
you might want to mention that early on in the conversation, because what you don't want is to have to repeat all of those steps because they don't realize that you've already tried them,
17:15
and telephone support may well put you on hold for extended periods. So I mentioned this earlier
17:21
on DSO. Look for alternatives It may be particularly the problem is not urgent, that there simply an email and you can send an email address. And you could just send your query to that email address
17:33
or, as again, we mentioned earlier. Instant chatting may be available at the vendor's Web site,
17:38
so you can instant message with a technician in real time. Another said before probably the wait time for that is a lot less than the wait time on the telephone.
17:52
So to summarize basic support concepts check for external issues. Make sure there is power in the building being provided to the device. The devices plug been and it's switched on.
18:03
Make sure if it is a battery operated device that the battery is charged up.
18:10
Um, look for any physical damage
18:12
done to the device. It's somebody may have dropped it, kicked it and so on.
18:17
Check the documentation that comes with the
18:21
device or software
18:22
check vendor websites. Check any online forums
18:26
on dhe if
18:29
any of those are not useful just to a general Internet search. And as I mentioned, it's a good idea to have the exact error message word for word that you saw
18:40
and then simply search for that using your favorite search engine.
18:44
And then there is technical support, which may or may not be available. Depending on the age of the product that you're trying to troubleshoot
18:52
on. It may or may not be free.
18:53
What some of these vendors do is
18:56
technical support is free for a limited time, and after that you have to pay to get technical support.
19:03
You might want to clarify that before you go any further with technical support

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