Backup Types

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Time
21 hours 25 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
21
Video Transcription
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>> Hey Cybrarians and welcome back to
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the Linux plus course here in Cybrary.
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I'm your instructor Rob Goels.
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In today's lesson we're going to
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be talking about backup types.
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Upon completion of this lesson,
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you are going to be able to differentiate between
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a system image, full differential,
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incremental and snapshot backup types,
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and then explain different backup schemes
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>> that we could use to baseline these backup types.
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>> Let's talk about these backup types first of all,
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there is the system image,
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which is also sometimes called a clone because
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>> it's an exact copy of the OS including binaries,
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>> applications, and configuration files.
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A full backup is
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a full backup of all the data on the system,
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but it doesn't include binaries,
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configuration files, things like that.
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An incremental backup is a copy of the data
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>> that has been modified
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>> since the last backup operation of anytime.
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>> By comparison, a differential backup copies
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any data that's been modified
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since the last full backup,
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so any change that has happened
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gets copied every day that that runs.
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It's not just incremental changes
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since the last backup ran,
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it's everything that got changed
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>> since the full backup that ran.
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>> Then a snapshot backup is a read-only copy
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>> that gets made a backup media
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>> and any new changes create pointers
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>> to that original data.
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>> Let's talk about backup schemes
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and elaborate on what we were talking about.
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We can take a full backup on Sunday
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>> and then take a differential backup
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>> Monday through Saturday.
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>> Then if there's a failure on Friday,
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we need to restore from backup,
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we only need the full backup
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>> and we took on Sunday
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>> and a differential backup from Thursday.
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>> Because remember, in a differential backup scheme,
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what's going to happen is
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the differential that gets run on Monday captures
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everything that changed from
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the last time the full backup is run on Sunday
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>> and then the one that runs on Tuesday
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>> captures everything that was run on Monday and Tuesday,
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Wednesday is Monday, Tuesday,
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Wednesday, and so on and so forth.
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Fewer backup tapes or needed to do a restore,
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for instance but these differential backups
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require more space because
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>> you're capturing absolutely every change
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>> that has occurred since you ran the full backup.
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Another option is you can take a full backup on Sunday
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>> and then just take an incremental backup
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>> from Monday through Saturday.
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>> This just means that any change that has occurred since
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the last incremental has ran will be backed up,
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but we don't need a capture
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absolutely every change since the full
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>> which capture the change
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>> that happens since we ran it back up
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>> on Monday for instance, it's incremental.
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However, if we have a failure on Friday,
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that means that we need the full backup,
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we need the incremental backup for Monday,
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we need the incremental backup from Tuesday,
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from Wednesday and from Thursday.
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We need more backups to restore,
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but these incremental backups
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require less space because
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>> they're only capturing the changes
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>> that happened since the last backup,
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>> not since the last full backup.
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The downside of doing this honestly
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>> is that a lot of times
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>> if you're doing backups to something like tape,
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>> they tend to get spread between different tapes
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>> and if you have to recall your tapes back
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>> from your place,
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>> you're storing your offsite tapes,
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you're going to end up having to put a lot of them into
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your tape machine and read them back off of there.
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A weekly full backup should be
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taken at a minimum regardless,
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whatever backup scheme that you use
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>> and an assistant image backup
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>> should be taken at least once
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>> for anything that's really mission critical.
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>> Ideally, if you're talking about a virtual machine,
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I would clone that system at least quarterly to have
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a full system backup of
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that critical system once a quarter.
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Now snapshot backups are really good to do
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before you have any change operation
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>> t hat can cause an outage,
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>> such as patching the operating system
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or anything of that nature.
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A snapshot backups are also
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>> the domain of virtual machines
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>> and they're pretty easy to roll back most changes,
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>> so keep that in mind
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when you're doing things like patching,
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it's very, very helpful to have those snapshot backups.
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With that, in this lesson, we covered the difference
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between backup types such as a system image,
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full differential, incremental, and snapshot backups,
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we talked about two different types of backup schemes
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>> that you could use and then we talked about
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>> when do you use full system images
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>> and snapshot backups.
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Thanks so much for being here
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>> and I look forward to seeing you in the next lesson.
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