Time
6 hours 53 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate
CEU/CPE
6

Video Transcription

00:00
the PSC roll this is again is an idealized situation where you're you staffed up your PSC before the project charter is complete.
00:09
Um, in sign
00:12
or well, you know not not a big deal. But the project chartered
00:16
is the project's constitution.
00:19
So part of
00:21
the role of the PSC is to be the guardian
00:25
of said Constitution. So you're almost a combination of the Supreme Court
00:30
as well as the state legislators as well as
00:34
Congress,
00:36
all rolled into one. So you have to be
00:39
knowledgeable in about
00:41
the project Charter
00:43
that if you see something come across during one of these meetings, it's outside the charter. Yours go.
00:50
That's outside the product harder. This is not being addressed. It needs to be addressed. We have to modify the project
00:56
and the product charter. You know the outcomes and deliver Bols the objectives. Those were the key elements of the charter. So those things change,
01:03
then the PSC is gonna be heavily involved in
01:07
understanding and approving that change or disproving that change.
01:12
It all just kind of depends on the situation. But
01:15
you, as a member of the PSC,
01:18
are the gatekeeper
01:21
of the Project Constitution
01:23
and as a project manager within
01:26
Enterprise Project Management. You have to
01:29
recognize that respect it
01:30
and just know that when the time comes to make changes to the charter, this is gonna be the process you gotta bring that to. The PSC,
01:40
you have to say, is what the Constitution used to say, but some new information become available.
01:45
This is what the product charter, I think it means to say,
01:49
Here's the M
01:49
impact to your iron triangle, right cost
01:55
scope
01:57
or performance criteria, or just cost schedule forthe cafeteria
02:00
to be approved. This change or disapproved this change
02:05
and
02:06
whatever the final version of this project chartered looks like or the Project Constitution
02:12
is what's going to be used in the project closure report to determine whether the project was successful.
02:19
So if you had, say, 10 requirements going into it and Number 10 was, ah, very elaborate disaster recovery
02:25
operation,
02:28
whatever
02:29
and some
02:30
at some point during the project
02:31
you
02:34
were given the option of
02:36
eliminating disaster recovery.
02:38
Then,
02:39
if you do elected eliminated, that is no longer can be held against the project manager that they failed to develop a disaster recovery site. That's all
02:50
so the successor of the failure of the project, which often impacts the project. Managers resume their career advancement. Things like that.
02:59
It's gonna be based on the project charter. So the PSC needs to
03:04
jealously guard
03:07
modifications to
03:09
project charter, and they need to be the only group of people
03:14
they can either approve or decline changes again
03:17
outside of large changes that need to go the SC.
03:22
So we talked a lot about change control. There's some really good quote
03:27
I personally find inspirational.
03:30
We'll see a good kind of way.
03:32
The PSC
03:35
is
03:36
the decision making body for changes
03:38
officially,
03:40
Um,
03:42
but at the same time, the PSC has to recognize
03:45
that new a battle plan ever survives contact with the enemy.
03:47
Um,
03:49
deliberate strategy is no longer
03:53
100 well, probably was never 100% reliable, but it's even less reliable now than it used to be.
04:00
So emerging strategy is key, so changes themselves
04:03
are not bad.
04:06
Sometimes changes indicate
04:10
failure to properly plan the project, and that
04:14
is bad in the sense of we want a document that for lessons learned
04:17
but often times changes
04:23
just part of life. Part of project manager
04:26
so changes aren't inherently bad,
04:28
but you want to use your deliberative in your emergent strategy skills
04:32
to determine whether those changes Aaron scope or add a scope, whether the project should
04:39
be changing minute by minute, hour by hour, which is very difficult s cute
04:43
or whether
04:44
there are certain things that can probably move on to,
04:47
you know, face to face three.
04:50
The maintenance of whatever it is that you're building. So if you think about you know,
04:57
perfect is the enemy of good enough. So sometimes things that are good enough are just good enough. It's okay
05:02
to be good enough and then go back to those
05:06
areas and improve them later.
05:10
If you wait for perfection, you may have a project that goes on forever.
05:15
So the PSC is a phase gate
05:17
decision gate
05:19
for those kinds of things when it comes to change control, and that's very important. So
05:25
don't abdicate your authority. If you're a member of a PSC for change control,
05:30
and if you're the enterprise project manager,
05:33
don't let them advocate the authority. Pertain control.
05:39
Put your back onto you.
05:40
It happens. It's normal. Our life, not a big deal,
05:44
lad, needs to be controlled.
05:46
Um, so we talked about the project
05:48
execution, but we also within that
05:51
not to be overly PM I centric,
05:55
but there's a you admiring, controlling area. So project monitoring
05:59
what are the things that you need to do within project governance to
06:02
effectively monitor project into meat
06:06
as often as you to meet biweekly monthly
06:10
weekly, whatever it is going to depend on the project, But you're gonna meet,
06:15
you're gonna approve the stash reports so that it has the appropriate level of political support. When it becomes public,
06:21
you're gonna measure the progress via one of the three methods that we had talked about before.
06:27
Um,
06:29
each one has a strength of weakness, but the important thing is that you're measuring progress. You're holding that project manager accountable
06:36
for what they're telling.
06:39
At the same token,
06:40
if the project manager brings you challenge or a roadblock,
06:45
part of your role as a member of the PSC is to eliminate those roadblocks. You're a senior manager or a senior executive for a reason.
06:53
You can eliminate roadblocks. You're not very useful to the project manager.
06:58
You're gonna prove changes.
07:00
Uh, at the same token, you're gonna hold a project manager accountable,
07:03
so
07:05
responsibility and accountability kind of flow both ways in this In this regard,
07:11
the PSC As a rule, the product manager has a
07:14
each group or individual. In the case of the project, Manager
07:17
needs to be able and feel comfortable
07:21
holding the other group accountable for their roles. And that's why identifying those roles and responsibilities
07:28
early on the project is so important so that it's not a he said. She said. Uh,
07:34
any sort of political battle. It's just reality. Reality is, is on the PM for the moment,
07:41
and I say, Hey, P S C. I can't make a change to this project until you approve the change so that I could change the scope
07:49
that should not offend the PSC or in any way
07:54
cause they make. I agree.
07:55
You
07:57
specify that your expectations early they go, Yeah, you're right. That's our role.
08:01
We have to look at the change and approve it before you can do it, so we're not gonna hold you accountable for that part. However, we're gonna hold you accountable for these tasks being late because you were supposed to have done two weeks ago and they haven't been.
08:13
And again, it's not adversarial in the sense of finger pointing and trying to throw somebody under the bus. It's just having clear defined roles within project management.
08:24
So in summary of this very long lesson, but very important lesson
08:28
in the next us, and we're gonna talk about
08:31
organizational change management, and you should find that fairly interest
08:35
again. Thank you for attending and look forward to seeing in the next video.

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Enterprise Project Management

In this Enterprise Project Management (EPM) training course, students will learn the fundamentals of managing projects at an enterprise level, including connecting previous project management knowledge to leadership’s vision and mission for the project.

Instructed By

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Kane Tomlin
Executive Consultant at FDOT, Professor
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