Security Concepts in Windows and Linux Environments
Learn On Demand
Learn On Demand Pro Series

Time
2 hours
Difficulty
Beginner

This IT Pro Challenge hands-on lab shows learners some fundamental network security concepts, including analyzing network traffic and network scans, configure both Linux and Windows firewall rules, configure a Windows PPTP VPN and Windows 10 VPN to secure network traffic, and use Windows Group Policy Management to secure Windows domain computers.

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Overview

In this IT Pro Challenge lab, learners will understand how to use Wireshark to identify different types of network traffic, use Zenmap to create and analyze a network scan, create a Linux firewall rule, configure both Windows PPTP VPN and a Windows 10 VPN client to secure network traffic, and use Group Policy Management to create a Windows firewall rule and update the sign-in and password behavior to secure Windows domain computers. The skills acquired in this lab are useful for a career as a network or system administrator.

Overview

By taking this lab, you will learn how to configure security settings in both Microsoft Windows and Linux environments. You will have a domain controller (DC1-CA) running Windows Server 2016 and a client virtual machine running Windows 10 that are members of the same domain. There are also two Ubuntu Linux machines running on the same network.

You will start by using network packet capture and analysis to identify network traffic types, and then use Nmap to identify hosts, network services, and possible vulnerabilities. Then, to secure network traffic, you will configure Linux firewall rules and a Windows Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) VPN server/client. Finally, you will secure Windows domain machines and use Microsoft Group Policy to create a Windows firewall rule.

Identify network traffic types by using Wireshark To begin, you will use Wireshark to identify different types of network traffic between the domain controller and one of the Ubuntu Linux virtual machines (Ubuntu1). You will analyze both successful and failed network connections between the two.

Wireshark is a free, open-source tool used for analyzing and troubleshooting networks.

Perform and analyze a network scan by using Zenmap

Next, you will use the graphical user interface (GUI), Zenmap, to identify and analyze open ports and network services that are running on the network. Zenmap is part of the Nmap utility, which is used to scan network security.

Create a Linux firewall rule

In this step, you will enable Uncomplicated Firewall (UFW), the default firewall configuration tool for Ubuntu, to secure Ubuntu1. To accomplish this, you will enable UFW on Ubuntu1, verify that incoming Secure Shell (SSH) connection attempts to Ubuntu1 fail, create a new firewall rule that allows incoming SSH connections to Ubuntu1, and then verify your work by making sure incoming SSH connection attempts are now successful.

Configure a Windows PPTP VPN to secure network traffic

Now you will configure a Windows PPTP VPN to secure network traffic by first configuring a VPN server on the domain controller, configuring the VPN client on the client (Client1), and then testing the connection between the two.

PPTP is a Windows VPN protocol that is used to communicate over encrypted virtual networks.

Configure a Windows 10 VPN client on Client1

In this part of the lab, you will configure a Windows 10 VPN client on Client1 and then attempt a connection between Client1 and the domain controller. Using the command prompt, you will run the ipconfig command to view the VPN network configuration. If the connection were successful, you would see that Client1 now has an IPv4 address (PPP adapter) from the domain controller. If you then ping that secondary IPv4 address, you will see a reply that verifies the routing between the domain controller and Client1.

Secure Windows domain computers by using Group Policy

Now you will use the Group Policy Management console to configure Group Policy for the computers on a domain. You will first change the sign-in behavior so that the previous user’s information is not displayed; then, you will change the minimum password length, reduce the maximum password age, and disable the guest user account.

Configure a Windows firewall rule by using Group Policy

In the final task of the lab, you will use the Group Policy Management tool to edit the Windows firewall to block all inbound traffic. You will verify your work by attempting to ping the domain controller. If the ping fails, you properly configured the Windows firewall rule.

Think you know it? Prove it!

Before you finish, you can validate your work in the lab.

Summary Conclusion

By taking this virtual lab, you will learn how to identify different types of network traffic, perform a network scan, create a Linux firewall rule, configure both a Windows PPTP VPN and a Windows 10 VPN client, and use Group Policy Management to configure Group Policy and a Windows firewall rule.