Time
10 hours 41 minutes
Difficulty
Beginner
CEU/CPE
12

Video Transcription

00:05
most electronic computing and related devices have some sort of video display,
00:10
whether a screen on a computer mobile device or projector projecting images from another source. Some type of video is frequently relied on
00:18
when an occasional issue occurs with video and displays basic troubleshooting. Continue Clea. Address it.
00:24
Standard Windows, laptops and desktops come with the basic display setting, known as V G a mode.
00:30
This display mode is a generic 6 40 by 4 80 low resolution, and it's typically seen when a video card does not have the required drivers installed.
00:39
The images on the display are very large and blurry.
00:43
PGA mode could be useful in trouble shooting display issues by switching into this mode when problems are experienced with the video card or its driver.
00:51
When adding a new video card, installed the drivers before installing the card and delete older drivers that are no longer needed.
00:58
No image at all on a screen can be attributed to a number of issues, a disconnected or bad cable or faulty monitor or video card.
01:06
Try replacing the video cable with the known working cable to see if that resolves the issue.
01:11
Make sure the cables plugged in properly
01:14
with laptops. The internal display cable may be damaged. Try connecting it to an external display
01:19
to verify the monitor itself is working. Swap it out with a known working monitor, or try the troublesome monitor on a different system.
01:27
An incorrect configuration could create issues. For instance, the wrong cable or input source selected like video sent from a system via HD in my cable and port. But the import source on the monitor set the V G a
01:42
many times. A display issue may be a simple as a configuration or setting air.
01:47
Oversized images and icons will occur if resolution settings were inadvertently adjusted, the zoom accessibility tool was activated, or even the size of the desktop theme was changed.
01:57
Booting the system in V. G. A mode is another cause for change in size of the images and icons.
02:04
Displays tend to interpret video and put slightly different than one another. Differences between the hue, gamma brightness and contrast maybe noticed between displays of the same make and model
02:15
a monitor may need. Calibrated to ensure colors are displaying as intended.
02:20
Windows and Mac systems have a display calibration tool.
02:23
If a display is dim. The brightness setting may need adjusted or the device could be faulty.
02:30
Check for any loose or faulty cables, updated display driver and restart the system.
02:36
Another symptom of malfunctioning display hardware is artifacts.
02:39
Artifacts are display anomalies that can be caused by overheating components, faulty graphics card or display over clocking hardware or bad memory
02:50
confirmed. All external hardware and internal components are clean and working properly,
02:53
if possible. Confirmed the systems over clock setting is disabled to keep any hardware from running faster than the manufacturer intended.
03:01
Dead pixels on a screen is usually a sign of a malfunctioning or failing device.
03:07
The pixel issue is normally seen in LCD displays.
03:09
A dead pixel will look a lot like a dot on the display and will either be consistently bright or dark in color.
03:15
There are APS that attempt to repair dead pixels on mobile device screens
03:20
for Windows displays. The U D pixel utility may be able to repair dead pixels but requires a long run time to do so.
03:28
Certain types of displays, like plasmas, are susceptible to burn in.
03:31
Burnin is when the same image is displayed on the screen over a long period of time,
03:37
causing damage to the pixels.
03:38
When the display is turned off, a faint but permanent discoloration remains visible. To prevent burning, use a screen saver or power off the device. When not in use,
03:49
a flickering display could be corrected by adjusting the refresh rate
03:53
a laptop screen. That flickers may be a sign of a failing backlight and need repaired or replaced
03:59
for distortion, such as a stretched or pulled image Check. The resolution settings
04:03
use the recommended settings for the display being used.
04:06
A distorted geometric shape is a common issue for projectors and old Sieroty displays
04:13
to fix a projector image at just the keystone settings or move the physical device up and down to adjust the way the images projected on the screen,
04:20
Check the location settings for the way the projector is physically mounted or position.
04:26
If the setting is set, the ceiling mount, but the device is sitting on the table. The image may appear distorted.
04:31
An issue that projectors are sensitive to that can cause an unexpected shutdown is overheating.
04:36
Projectors should be kept clean and have filters replaced as needed.
04:41
Ensure the projectors. Air vent is clear and airflow is not restricted.
04:45
One way to reduce the heat produced is adjust settings.
04:48
The higher the brightness, the heart of the projector has to work.
04:51
Projectors need a proper shutdown to ensure the cool down feature runs before the power is completely shut off.
04:58
Ensuring proper cooling and shutdown is beneficial to the longevity of most displays. While monitors and device displays have advanced significantly over the years and are one of the most reliable elements of computing,
05:10
occasional issues will surface that basic troubleshooting should lead to the cause and steps for remediation.