Time
13 hours 57 minutes
Difficulty
Beginner
CEU/CPE
14

Video Transcription

00:00
Hello. Welcome back to I see into you one interconnecting Cisco networking devices. Part one.
00:06
This is up sewed 11 to T C P I p model. I am trending Daryl and I will be the instructor for this course
00:12
in the last video of one over some basic questions about the TCP I P model and also the OS I model.
00:18
In this episode, we're gonna be covered on Lee the TCP I p model
00:24
learning objectives for this episode,
00:26
we're gonna learn the layers of TCP epi model.
00:29
We're gonna go over the history of it.
00:32
And lastly, we're gonna look at the common protocols in each layer.
00:40
All right, so first, we're gonna get into a quick pre assessment.
00:42
So we're gonna look up the layers of the TCP I P model. Hopefully, by now, you kind of got a general idea by looking up some of the other questions.
00:50
Otherwise, I'll give you a few moments here to pause the video and look it up.
00:57
Okay. Hopefully you got it already. We're gonna go ahead and continue. I'm gonna bring up the answer.
01:03
All right, So this is actually the updated TCP I P model some of the models you might see, you might see the data link in the physical layer or physical network layer
01:11
combined it a one just called the Linklater Sometimes.
01:15
Well, you're gonna have your application. Layer your transport, layer your Internet layer your data link layer on your physical network layer.
01:26
So we're gonna go over the quick history of C C P I. P. Model. Originally, when networking first started, we had these vendor specific protocols that only supported their equipment.
01:36
And network engineers not only had to learn each of these protocols, but they had to support them as well.
01:41
So if a company used two different vendors for computer systems, he never comes near now, had to create two different networks for those systems.
01:48
So you see, if you had multiple companies and you had mergers that all had to create different networks and I had to find a way to communicate those networks, it was a little difficult.
01:57
Now he's vendor Specific protocols worked pretty well for their products with the International Organization for Standardization. R I S O started work on the OS I model in the late 19 seventies to try and create a standard model in order to get all the computers to be able to talk to each other
02:13
instead of going down this vendor specific model.
02:16
Now, I did get a little traction, but didn't, you know, didn't quite take off. But the d o. D actually contract out the work on another model in the early eighties.
02:25
And that actually got more attraction, which later became the TCP I P model.
02:31
In the early nineties, these company had both the O S I and the TCP I p model and their service is and their devices.
02:38
But by the late nineties, the TCP I P model had become successor between Aussie TCP
02:45
of some vendor Specific protocols do exist still like the Apple Talk protocol,
02:50
but they're not quite as used, and they still have the other T c P I P stack, as it might be called
02:55
other devices. That way they can communicate on the Internet.
03:00
So a t c p I p model. Here we have the two. You see the two different models. The top one is the new model or the updated model.
03:07
And on the bottom, you see the older bottle that combines the link
03:13
layer or the data links layer and the physical Aaronson link or network interface layer.
03:20
So the one good thing that T c p i p model does. They didn't trying to rewrite the book out everything. You know, they already used the existing IEEE standards that were in place, like 802.3. Ethan, that standard, they didn't try and rewrite it. They just took it, you know? So that was already there
03:35
and use it. Utilize it.
03:38
The original T Z P I. P model is actually defined in our C 11 22.
03:46
So if we look at the bottom picture there, you can kind of see,
03:51
So when you're sending data out, you're gonna go from the application layer
03:54
down,
03:58
and then when you're getting information back in here, you're gonna go up the stack like this.
04:03
But if you look at some of these protocols for each layer,
04:08
remind this this is oh aside for now,
04:11
we're looking at TCP.
04:14
So if we look at application layer looking ftp or your file transfer protocol telling, that's which, hopefully you're not using too much anymore S and M P
04:24
http ss a chair throwing that transport looking a TCP verses UDP
04:30
the Internet layer You're looking at I p r. But I see MPRP is the address resolution protocols we said in the last video,
04:35
and we're gonna learn about that in this course, So don't worry. I see appears like your ping command. Almost. If you don't think of it like that,
04:44
the data link layers your point, the point protocol, and you're IEEE able to to physical network. They're gonna be looking at, you know, physical standards like the actual Ethernet standards like the U T. P cabling
04:55
the categories in token ring Zara's to 30 twos.
04:59
So finally we get to the post assessment here, which d c p I P layer deals with common user programs.
05:04
This one hopefully shouldn't take you too long, But I'll give you just a moment deposit video and go back to it.
05:11
All right, so hopefully figure it out.
05:13
I should be the application layer.
05:15
As we said in the previous slides,
05:18
looking at http
05:21
and other programs that users commonly use
05:27
on the next episode, we're gonna be talking about T C I p model layers. That's gonna be the application layer transport layer Internet layer. The network access layer, which you gotta remember. The Ark axis layer is also broken up into the data link and physical layer.
05:42
And once again, if you guys have questions, you need help. Or if you have a funny photos, go ahead and feel free to contact me. Thank you. And I look forward to seeing you and Nice, of course.

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