Reducing Costs on Azure

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Time
3 hours 51 minutes
Difficulty
Beginner
CEU/CPE
4
Video Transcription
00:01
Now that we know how to estimate and monitor our cloud costs, let's look at the ways to reduce them.
00:07
Let's start with a few ideas on how to reduce our infrastructure costs.
00:11
We've already hinted at a few options.
00:15
Using reserved instances for starting VM, workloads can reduce your costs between 70 and 80%.
00:22
Purchasing reserved instances is done on an annual or three year term, and you need to pre pay for the whole term.
00:29
However, if you plan to run those for long periods of time and combine the purchase with hybrid benefits, you can get up to an 80% discount.
00:39
Right sizing VMS is, of course, the other option we discussed.
00:43
You can leverage the azure advisor to help you with that,
00:47
as those VMS cost is linear and doubles within the VM family.
00:51
And you can reduce your VM cost in house by simply choosing a VM of one size. Smaller
00:59
as we mentioned before, different regions have different prices for the same resource types.
01:04
If it's not critical, just choose a location that's cheaper.
01:07
Not all virtual machines need to be run all the time.
01:11
You can save a lot of compute charges. If you d allocate the VMS during off hours,
01:18
you can use as your automation to stop and start machines overnight. When your employees aren't working.
01:23
It may be obvious, but you can be surprised as to how many resources are still available in the cloud. Although nobody is using them,
01:30
you can develop an automation script and periodically run scans that can notify the owners of unused resources to delete them.
01:38
Certain subscriptions, like visual studio subscriptions, have azure credits apply to them.
01:45
Visual Studio Professional has $50 a month, while Visual Studio Enterprise has 100 $50 a month.
01:53
Your developers can use those for learning, developing and testing activities.
01:59
Visual studio subscriptions have so called spending limits
02:01
once you exceed the limit. All resources in the subscription are disabled, and you are not charged for those
02:07
when the billing period ends. If there are still credits remaining, the resources are activated and you can use them again.
02:15
Not all subscription types allow you to have spending limits.
02:20
If this is the case, you can at least set the budget and at least get a notification when the budget is exceeded.
02:27
Last but not least, you can migrate to pass and SAS services that offer significant cost savings.
02:34
Depending on the application, though there may be some challenges with this approach because it may require significant development effort.
02:42
Licensing is another area where you can save on costs.
02:46
Here are some ways you can do that.
02:47
There's a difference in pricing between Lennox and Windows workloads because Windows ones include a licensing cost.
02:54
If you do not require a Windows operating system, you may want to choose Lennox to save on costs.
03:01
You can use Dev test subscriptions to save on costs for your non production environment.
03:07
Both enterprise and pay as you go Subscriptions have the option for Dev test benefits.
03:13
There are some restrictions, though.
03:15
First, those are limited to non production environments only. And second, any users of the workload must be covered by the visual studio subscription.
03:25
Another option to save on licensing costs is to use the hybrid benefits for Windows servers.
03:31
If you have already invested in licenses for your on premises servers, this can be a great option.
03:38
You can use those licenses for virtual machines on azure.
03:42
To be eligible for that,
03:43
your license for your windows server must be covered by software assurance.
03:47
Here's how that works.
03:50
Each two processor or 16 core license is entitled to two instances with up to eight cores or one instance with up to 16 cores in azure.
04:00
Standard edition licenses can be used either on premises or in azure, but not simultaneously in both
04:08
data center. Additional licenses can be used simultaneously on premises and an azure, which means that you can cover two VMS with a single license.
04:18
SQL Server is another Microsoft product that is licensed per CPU,
04:25
similar to Windows benefits. You need to have software assurance to use them.
04:30
You can use your hybrid benefits for azure SQL V Corps based options or SQL, on virtual machines.
04:36
If you have standard edition per core licenses, you can get one V corps in the General Purpose service Tier of Azure SQL.
04:46
If you have Enterprise Edition per core licenses, you can get one V corps in the business critical service tier of Azure SQL.
04:54
If you have highly Virtualized Enterprise Edition per core licenses, you can get four V cores in the business critical service tier of azure SQL
05:04
for SQL servers on Azure VMS. The licenses match 1 to 1.
05:11
If you have enterprise agreements, you have freedom licenses from your on premises workloads, and you can use those on azure.
05:17
Just search for bring your own license or B y o L resources in the azure marketplace.
05:24
You can also use the SQL Server Developer edition for your non production workloads.
05:29
This is a free product offered by Microsoft, and you can find it in the azure marketplace.
05:34
And last but not least, you can use container instances for workloads that require a lot of memory storage and I o bandwidth,
05:43
but don't require a lot of CPU cores.
05:46
This way, you don't need to pay as many licensing fees per core.
05:51
Such instance types are the D. S, E. S, G S and M s series.
05:58
And with this, we are wrapping up our discussion on managing costs and savings in Azure
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