Time
23 hours 18 minutes
Difficulty
Beginner
CEU/CPE
14

Video Transcription

00:00
Hello and welcome back to I see anyone interconnecting Cisco networking devices. Part one.
00:05
This is absolute 312 collision of broadcast domains and V lines
00:09
and threatened Daryl and I will be your instructor for this course. Last video, we just went over the lesson 3.1 overview and some quick, pretty assessment questions.
00:17
This episode we're gonna cover the collision of broadcasting means in Savi lines.
00:22
And like I said, we're gonna look at the collision. Broad hat, collision, domain history and the current design. We look at broadcast domains. They were gonna have a brief introduction of what V lines are.
00:32
As always, we'll start off with a pre assessment here. What device splits up the broadcast domains? Assuming all devices are on the line One.
00:41
Remember this from the lesson intro receiving. Feared out.
00:46
Yes, it is. The router
00:50
wrestle. Jump in with collision domains. Here
00:53
it's In the past, we didn't really have the tech to avoid them.
00:57
Um, we had tubs and the hosts used the CSM, a CD of the collision detection to remember it sits there and waits for
01:04
a busy signal. Or if there is a signal on the line is open.
01:08
So now we can actually avoid collision domains completely with switches and bridges switches, Mainly. Now there are more advanced version of bridges.
01:19
So including women, is a set of interfaces and device ports that if they send a frame at the same time, they would collide.
01:26
So what do we do here is I'm gonna go ahead and just draw in a hub,
01:36
huh? Been there. So let's say he said, the way the hub works, let's say he's going to send a packet, goes in here,
01:42
and it's just gonna repeat it out. Both ends here,
01:47
so that's why it works.
01:49
All right, So let's see that both these guys kind of get ready. Signal. They're both trying to send a
01:56
unit are frame over here,
01:57
so they both send at the same time.
02:00
And because the hub doesn't realize it doesn't work on collision detection, it just sends both at same time. So here is the collision
02:08
when they both send them at the same time.
02:12
So bridges will actually separate the collision domain so it uses the bridge will actually use that collision detection rules. I'm like the hub. So if they both come in here at the same time.
02:23
Who's drawbridge there? So if the frame comes in here at the same time,
02:30
there is gonna let that one go first. Then once that goes through, then it'll send this one, so that way they don't Clyde.
02:37
So switch is actually kind of the same as bridges, but they're faster with more features. They have a six, which is hardware that's built for specific cause.
02:46
Um, and then each link in this will actually be a collision domain.
02:50
So the hub
02:53
this entire saying is one collision domain.
02:58
Okay,
03:00
with a switch or a bridge.
03:05
This is a question domain. This is a collision domain. This is a question of Maine.
03:09
This is what I mean by presently. They could be completely avoided. As long as
03:15
the key here is both of these ants must be using full duplex. Okay,
03:21
They will avoid any collisions.
03:24
So we gonna go through a quick, practical exercise. Your idea. Pause the video If you want to. You can draw this out. So here we have a hub. We have a router
03:34
and switch over here and a bridge or here. So what I'll do is I'll have you draw out or just two circles around what you think the collision domains are. So go ahead and positivity on receiving figured out.
03:49
All right, so here the answers. So remember that the switch,
03:54
we'll do one on each link, and then there's one in between the rotors
03:59
and remember that the
04:01
rotor
04:03
and the bridge will separate it as well. So here we have a hug. Everything's at one clich? Domain. And here we have a hub.
04:11
So everything is on a collision domain there.
04:15
No jumping a broadcast, Amis. Remember, you have your broadcasts address for, uh, dcp AARP A few other protocols.
04:25
So broadcast domain is a set of ice is where the broadcast is set to an entire network or sub network.
04:30
Your son now
04:33
So only a router is not going to Ford a broadcast.
04:38
But here's where the issue came in and was in the past. If we have all these switches trying to connect to the router trying to celebrate broadcast means that just took up a ton of broader space on the interfaces, so they're gonna actually do. To break up these broadcast remains was implement villains of virtual lands
04:59
toe where you could say, you know,
05:01
recurrently
05:03
This right here is one broadcast domain. Okay, It would be the same over on the right side so he could actually do it. You could split this off and say he is a villain.
05:15
10.
05:15
You could say he is Villain
05:18
20. So these these what I should be to broadcast remains,
05:23
right?
05:25
So we'll go ahead and split into the practice exercise,
05:29
and here we're gonna assume that all of them are on the same V line. Okay, So go ahead and was the video. And see if you can figure out where the different broadcast remains are
05:43
all right. Hopefully you got here, because remember, the router is going to split the broadcast domains
05:47
right here, right here. And because these are all assumed to be on the same villain,
05:54
this is gonna be one big broadcast. A man. That's a router.
05:59
All right, So here's where we're talking about the V lane. A virtual land. So land is just consist of all the devices in the same broadcast to Maine, In essence. Okay,
06:09
So before be lands like I said, we had to utilize the routers to break up the lines and consumed a lot of ports and that router.
06:15
So villains were implemented at the switchboard interface to separate the broadcast traffic. Now we use the assuming. Don't have a layer three switch freezing layer to switch. The routers must now separating around the traffic. So let's say
06:29
we have this guy down here that wants to send a message up to this guy up here.
06:33
It'll go in, hit the switch, go to the rotor
06:38
and back in, then back down. So what? That's actually kind of is a router out of stick. We'll go through it a little bit later.
06:45
Um, here is just a quick, quick and dirty.
06:48
How does it change your view? An I D. On the interface, you'll be under interface configuration boat.
06:56
So here's what it looks like when you separate your broadcast domains, which your V lands, right?
07:01
Is it the top? These two computers, Aaron View and 10.
07:04
This bottom one is a villain 20 like we had before.
07:10
So it's gonna split up that broadcast domain.
07:14
All right, we will get into the post assessment. Hopefully, you know this
07:18
really in separate what?
07:25
Yes, The broadcast domains so we can live without collisions. And really, we want to live without collisions because they will slit on the network. But we expect I said, we need the broadcast. They have to. They can just be on one link because you know, the relied upon for D H, E P and our protocols.
07:44
All right. In the next episode, we're going to look at the campus land apologies.
07:49
And, as always, if you guys have questions, need some help. Feel free to shoot me a message, and I'll be glad to get back to you. Otherwise, thank you for washing This lesson, like 40 is seen in the next one.

Up Next

CCNA ICND1

This course will enable students to understand virtualization and cloud services, and network programmability related to LAN, access and core segments.

Instructed By

Instructor Profile Image
Trenton Darrow
Network Engineer at NCI Information Systems, Inc
Instructor