Azure Traffic Manager

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Time
3 hours 51 minutes
Difficulty
Beginner
CEU/CPE
4
Video Transcription
00:00
In this video, we will see how we can use azure traffic manager to scale our application globally.
00:07
You can use a load balancer to achieve high availability and provide resiliency for your application in a single region.
00:13
But what if you have customers around the world
00:17
if your application is deployed in the West US two region, but your users are in Germany,
00:22
every request they make will need to travel to the U. S. West Coast and back.
00:27
It doesn't matter how fast you process the request in the data center or how fast the user center net connection is.
00:34
It takes time for the data to travel from Berlin to Washington and back
00:40
the time needed for the data to travel over the network is called latency, and it is measured in milliseconds.
00:47
Wouldn't it be faster if the request traveled to the Germany Northeast region only instead of to the US West region?
00:55
In the original scenario, the distance is approximately 5000 miles, while in the second
01:00
it's only 100.
01:02
Having your application deport around the world was significantly improve the user experience because it will reduce the network latency for the user's requests But
01:11
how do you implement that?
01:14
Well, you can use a service that provides global load balancing functionality like azure traffic manager.
01:21
Here's how it works.
01:23
You deploy exact copies of your Web application in each region. You have customers,
01:26
Let's say US West two, North East Germany and South East Asia.
01:32
Each deployment is accessible via deployment specific. DNS name.
01:37
You can figure the azure traffic manager with those three end points.
01:41
When a user types that you are all of your website. The request is first evaluated by the traffic manager.
01:47
The traffic manager is a global azure service, and the user request is sent to the end point closest to the user.
01:53
Let's say the user is in Berlin.
01:56
Azure traffic manager determines the location of the user,
01:59
and instead of sending the request to West US two, it sends it to the closest deployment of the application.
02:05
In this case, the Germany Northeast deployment.
02:07
The traffic doesn't go through the traffic manager.
02:10
The only thing that the traffic manager does is report the user's DNS entry for my company dot com to the local application endpoint.
02:20
If another request comes from Asia, it'll be reported to the Southeast Asia deployment.
02:24
Azure traffic manager also constantly monitors the availability of the regional deployment.
02:30
If one of the region fails, the requests will be forwarded to the closest available region.
02:37
In essence, Azure traffic manager works similar to the azure load balancer. But on a global scale,
02:44
another way to improve the experience for your users is to provide local cashing for static content.
02:51
To do this, you can use a content delivery network, or CDN.
02:54
A cdn is a distributive network of servers that cache content around the world.
03:00
Those services can be hosted in the cloud provider, but also at the local Internet provider.
03:06
This makes it even faster for accessing the content, because the request doesn't even need to travel to the closest Azure data center, but only to the ISP data center.
03:15
Typical usage of C. D. N S. R to cash html JavaScript or CSS files, images, videos or other multimedia content or large downloads.
03:28
Typically, those require high bandwidth connections for faster downloads.
03:31
Cashing it locally improves the user experience.
03:36
With this,
03:37
we are going to wrap up our modules for azure networking services
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