Azure Service Level Agreements

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Time
3 hours 51 minutes
Difficulty
Beginner
CEU/CPE
4
Video Transcription
00:00
Let's take a look at what Azure Lazar,
00:03
a service level agreement, or LA, is a formal document that specifies the Microsoft commitment to operate. The service
00:10
defines the performance standards like, for example, up time or connectivity guarantees that apply to that service
00:16
and outlines what happens if the service doesn't meet the specified standards.
00:22
Every product or service on Azure has their own LA.
00:26
What that means is that virtual machines may have a different S l A. Than as your storage, which might have a different S l. A. Than an SQL database.
00:36
There are also some special requirements regarding how the product should be used and configured in order to meet the L. A.
00:44
It is important to read the L A for each service that you plan to use, so you can understand what the impact will be on your application.
00:53
Very often, the performance target free services are expressed in the forms of up time and latency.
00:59
A typical example is Azure Cosmos DB, with 99.999% up time and 10 milliseconds. Latency on DB read and write operations.
01:11
You'll hear that a lot for a particular services. Three nines or five nines.
01:17
What those refer to is the up time of the service, expressed as a percent.
01:22
Three nines is 99.9% while 59 is 99.999%.
01:29
Here's a table that you can use to compare the up time expressed in percent to the down time, during which the service is not accessible, expressed in hours.
01:38
As you can see, there is a huge difference between the 99% up time and five nines uptime.
01:45
In the first case, the services inaccessible or down for more than seven hours per month,
01:51
while in the latter it's only inaccessible for 26 seconds.
01:56
Coming back to our example with Azure Cosmos db,
02:00
you should expect that services accessible practically all the time.
02:04
If that is not the case, you can complain to Microsoft and request a service credit.
02:09
If Microsoft is not able to keep the performance target for an azure service, they commit to compensating you for that.
02:16
This compensation can be in the form of a credit to your monthly bill for that particular service.
02:23
The following table shows the credit that you may be able to receive. If this service doesn't perform, according to the LA
02:30
Looking at the first row. What the table shows is that if the service up time is less than 99.9% or three nines, you will receive 10% credit towards your bill.
02:42
Looking back to the previous table. If the service is inaccessible for more than 43 minutes and 50 seconds per month,
02:50
you can receive 10% credit towards your bill for this service.
02:54
Keep in mind that the credit is only towards the cost of the underperforming service.
02:59
If you, for example, use virtual machines and as your storage and the virtual machines are not performing, according to the L. A. But as your storage is,
03:07
you will only receive a credit for the virtual machines charge.
03:12
You'll still need to pay the full bill for your storage consumption.
03:16
To actually request a credit,
03:19
you'll need to submit a service request to the Azure support team,
03:23
and we'll see how to do that in one of the next videos
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