Azure Datacenters and Regions

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Time
3 hours 51 minutes
Difficulty
Beginner
CEU/CPE
4
Video Transcription
00:00
Welcome back to Microsoft Azure Fundamentals.
00:03
This is Module three of the course Azure Global Infrastructure and SLA's
00:10
In this module will discuss as yours global footprint and the service guarantees it offers.
00:16
We'll start with an overview of azure data centers around the world and introduce some important terminology.
00:22
Then we'll talk about availability zones and how those relate to the global azure footprint.
00:28
After that, we'll define what a service level agreement is and talk about the fellas for different azure services.
00:36
And at the end, we'll learn how the for our own applications are impacted when using cloud services, as well as how to improve that
00:46
throughout, this module will introduce a lot of new terminology that you're going to need in your work with Azure.
00:52
Let's see how Azure is able to provide it services around the world.
00:57
Here's a map of Asia's global footprint.
01:00
It's available on azure website, and you can check it regularly for updates.
01:06
Each blue dot on the map represents the so called region.
01:10
A region is a geographical area with at least one but sometimes multiple data centers
01:15
as your controls the resources within the region to make sure that they're appropriately balanced. And at the time of this recording,
01:23
Azure has 48 available regions and six new ones. They've announced
01:29
two of the regions are not shown on the map because they are secret US government regions and are in undisclosed locations.
01:37
When you create a new resource in azure, you may be required to select a region.
01:42
Some services are available only in certain regions.
01:45
For example,
01:46
not all virtual machine sizes are available in every region.
01:49
G. C. D s VMS are available in west US to west US and east US two regions, but not in the other US regions.
02:00
There are also services that are global and do not require you to select a specific region.
02:05
Some examples are azure active directory as your traffic manager and as your DNS.
02:10
One important thing to note is that there are certain limits to the resources that you can create within a region.
02:16
If you reach this limit, you need to create a support ticket to extend the limit or create resources in another region where you have not reached the limit.
02:25
Some regions are special, though, and you can use them for building applications that need to meet certain compliance or legal requirements.
02:32
You may also not be allowed to deploy to those regions if you don't meet those compliance requirements.
02:39
The US government and Department of Defense regions are available for US government agencies and partners.
02:46
They are operated by personnel with higher clearance and have additional certifications.
02:52
China's regions are offered in partnership with a third party provider, and Microsoft doesn't maintain the data centers.
02:59
Germany's regions are available via Data Trustee model, where the data trustee is a Deutsche Telekom's company called T Systems.
03:07
This is the company that ensures that the data remains within Germany.
03:13
Now.
03:14
Why does Azure need data centers in so many regions?
03:17
Well, there are several reasons.
03:20
First, it allows you to bring your data and application closer to your customers.
03:24
It also provides better scalability and redundancy, and last but not least, it preserves the data residency for your users and helps you to stay compliant with local requirements
03:38
as your divides the world into four geography, ease
03:40
the Americas, Europe,
03:44
Asia Pacific and the Middle East and Africa.
03:47
A Geography is a discrete market with two or more regions that preserves residency and compliance boundaries.
03:54
So why is there yet another subdivision of the world?
03:59
Well, there are some legal and compliance reasons.
04:01
There are two main reasons for using geography ease.
04:05
They ensure that data residency and sovereignty requirements are honored within the geographical boundaries,
04:11
and they are fault tolerant to withstand complete region failure.
04:15
Speaking of data residency, one typical example is GDP are which we talked about in the previous videos.
04:23
The law requires that European citizens data is to remain on European soil.
04:30
Each azure region belongs to a single geography and has specific data residency compliance and service availability rules applied to it.
04:39
Another important thing to know about regions is that every region is paired with another region in the same geography.
04:46
This is called a region pair
04:48
Region pairs are helpful when you think about business continuity and disaster recovery plans.
04:54
Region Paris are directly connected and must be 300 miles away from each other.
05:00
This ensures that in the case of disaster, your workloads will continue to run even if one of the region's is down.
05:06
Some services offer automatic geo redundant data application using region pairs.
05:14
Additional advantages of region pairs are that in the case of extensive azure outage, one of the region's is prioritized to reduce the downtime.
05:23
Also planned updates are rolled out to regions with one at a time.
05:28
Additionally, data continues to reside within the same geography. If disaster occurs,
05:34
some examples of region pairs are East, US and West, US,
05:39
North Europe and Ireland, and West Europe in the Netherlands
05:42
and East Asia and South Asia.
05:45
One exception to the rule is Brazil South that is paired with South Central US.
05:50
In the next video, we'll look at what redundancy azure provides within a single region.
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