Time
2 hours 25 minutes
Difficulty
Beginner
CEU/CPE
3

Video Transcription

00:00
in this video, I'll be discussing the first type of us be dropped. Tak called the human interface device spoofing Attack or H I d. Spoofing for short.
00:08
We'll see how this type of attack works by masquerading as a keyboard.
00:13
Now, before you really understand this type of attack, we have to understand what human interface devices are now. These air devices that attach the computer via the USB poor are other ports that allow humans to input some sort of data to the computer
00:30
or allows the machine to provide some sort of output to the humans.
00:33
There's many examples. For example, keyboards allows humans to input keystrokes. Computer or headphones allows the computers to fight audio. Out to the humans are other devices clued mice and microphones, a swell as many others.
00:51
Now what H I D spoofing devices are is they masquerade as keyboards and do some sort of pre program pre program keystrokes and two machine.
01:03
So one of these, when these devices get plugged in ah computer. The computer just sees it as a keyboard and they think a humanist typing on it on a reality. It's its own separate device. Doing these pre program keystrokes.
01:18
Now this type of attack has the advantage of being very versatile. Thes attacks can be used across different operating systems because, of course, almost every machine out there requires a keyboard.
01:34
So these attacks can be used against Lennox Windows. Mac OS, you name it. Theater Hacker just has to know what they're attacking and program the device accordingly.
01:48
Now, there's several different options out there for four devices like this.
01:55
Um, now you can't just use any old device. You have to use devices that support keyboard emulation. Um, and this course will be using the picture on top, which is called the USB rubber Ducky. Now the advantage
02:10
This device, I believe has is the only one that has a
02:15
enclosure to make it look like a normal USB flash drive. I don't know of any other device out there that has that. Of course you can put enclosures on other devices, but this is the only one sold like that there. There's another version out there called mild. We knows
02:32
you see the two pictures below the top on those arm, lt knows,
02:38
And that's what by Mel Tronics. No, uh, not only does uh, use rubber ducky have a case, but, uh, Mallory knows are actually much cheaper. So if you prefer that device, you can go ahead and pick that one up.
02:54
Now, you can also build your own USB H i D. Smoothing devices from our Galina boards. And I think that's what Mel Dewey knows where actually are mildly. No boards.
03:07
Um, and you can also use specific USB flash drives. This does require a little bit more know how and set up, and, well, we won't be going over that in this course. But just know that that option is out there for you.
03:21
Now, these these devices use a specific type of scripting language called ducky script. This is a very simple language that basically does anything a keyboard could do.
03:32
Um, so if you haven't seen this scripting language before, don't worry. It's very easy to pick up. It just takes some time to get used to. But, uh, most people can pick this up very quickly.
03:46
Now there are a few drawbacks. This this type of attack,
03:51
these devices must be finished very quickly. Their attack must be very quick on the reason behind that is Ah, Lot of times victims may plug these devices in and May may see something they don't like. People get very paranoid. So if an attacker
04:11
isn't hiding their their payloads properly,
04:14
ah, victim and unplugged the device before it finishes.
04:17
Also, sometimes people may be impatient, and if they don't see any storage being shown after they plug in advice, they might also unplug it as well. So it's It's very crucial that thes types tax are are made very quickly
04:35
because if they're very slow, there's a good chance that
04:39
that someone won't plug these devices before they finish.

Up Next

USB Drop Attack

Malicious devices are everywhere these days, whether you can see them or not.

Instructed By

Instructor Profile Image
Shawn Briere
Information Security Analyst
Instructor