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This topic contains 26 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  jamesmmarsh1980 3 years, 6 months ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 27 total)
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  • #78218

    jamesmmarsh1980
    Participant

    have a question about dual boot OS ? I have window 10 on my computer right. I want to add any Linux OS to it. How can I do that ?

    #78256

    flowwebdesign
    Participant

    Hi…

    Go to settings > updates & security
    Go to recovery and the choose advanced startup

    Now you can choose too boot your computer from usb…

    Make sure you make a bootable usb with the operation system on it for the installation of linux and watch out that you dont whipe out your windows partition..

    #78336

    jamesmmarsh1980
    Participant

    There any guides that I can look at for dual booting?

    #78838

    Paul Rouk
    Participant

    Dual booting Windows and Linux had become fairly easy to do with Windows 7, but Windows 8/10 made some changes which added a new level of difficulty. The BIOS replacement (UEFI) can stop Linux from booting. Also, the new Windows fast startup feature can prevent Linux from accessing the Windows NTFS partition.

    The link below seems to be a very complete and detailed description of how to dual boot. I haven’t actually followed his steps, but this looks like one of the better procedures I’ve seen.

    http://www.everydaylinuxuser.com/2015/11/how-to-install-ubuntu-linux-alongside.html

    #78892

    jamesmmarsh1980
    Participant

    what changes was made to windows 8/10 to make it harder to install Linux ?

    #78904

    Paul Rouk
    Participant

    When Windows 8 was released, they also changed the BIOS over to the new Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI). One big change is UEFI is the addition of “secure boot” which is designed to stop boot sector viruses and rootkits from installing on your computer. A side effect of this is that your actual operating system now requires a security certificate in order to install. By default Windows has this certificate, but only some versions of Linux do (Red Hat, Fedora, & Ubuntu and maybe some others by now). As an alternative, on some computers you can go into UEFI to disable the secure boot feature.

    Another issue is that now with Windows 8/10 you always have to create a separate partition to install Linux to dual boot with Windows. Ubuntu Linux used to have a nice feature where you could use a program called Wubi to actually install Linux as a file on top of Windows NTFS. This avoided the problem of having to resize the Windows partition to make room for Linux which made installing and uninstalling much easier in my opinion.

    As a side issue, I used to use a Linux boot disk as a way of recovering files from a crashed Windows system. However, the Windows 8/10 fast boot feature leaves the NTFS in a state where it doesn’t like to be mounted outside of Windows. In fact, now you can actually corrupt your Windows file system by mounting it while Linux is running.

    https://www.linux.com/learn/how-install-linux-windows-machine-uefi-secure-boot

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/2951559/operating-systems/how-to-install-linux-on-a-pc-with-secure-boot-enabled.html

    The Pros and Cons of Windows 10’s “Fast Startup” Mode

    #78919

    jamesmmarsh1980
    Participant

    I found this YouTube video. https://youtu.be/KLj2yQPWZDk
    it have a easy process. 🙂

    #79020

    Paul Rouk
    Participant

    Interesting — I hadn’t heard of EasyBCD before. I haven’t tried dual boot with Windows 10 yet. However, my understanding is that the Linux grub boot loader would take care of the dual boot menu, so EasyBCD might be optional.

    I usually prefer to run Windows and Linux on different computers. Since Linux typically has lower hardware requirements than Windows, I usually just convert my old Windows computer over to Linux and get several more years of use out of it. I’ve actually had a 10 year old computer running Linux with acceptable performance for light usage (email and web browsing).

    #79920

    jamesmmarsh1980
    Participant

    I see Paul do you have any more suggestions?

    #80462

    Paul Rouk
    Participant

    I hadn’t tried dual booting since Windows 7, so I decided to give it a try today with Windows 10. The process was actually extremely easy. I just used the Windows disk manager to resize the Windows partition in order to create space for Ubuntu. Then I booted with an Ubuntu DVD and told it to install alongside of Windows. Everything went smoothly and when I restarted the computer both Ubuntu and Windows were available on the boot menu. Ubuntu was listed as the default OS to boot, but I’m sure that could be changed easily enough.

    When you are running Windows, it doesn’t even know that Linux is there. The only place you will see a trace of Linux is in disk manager which will show the additional partitions. If you boot from Ubuntu, you can see the Windows partition, but it will probably give an error if you try to mount it since the Windows fast boot process leaves NTFS in a state which can only be used by Windows.

    #80951

    jamesmmarsh1980
    Participant

    I see how many gigs should I make my partition for it ?

    #81017

    Paul Rouk
    Participant

    That is always a tricky question to answer since it depends on what you will be using it for. In theory you can get away with as little as 2 GB since Ubuntu can be installed on a USB stick of that size. However, you’ll obviously need a lot more than that in order to allow for system updates, installing software, and any data you want to store. You also need to consider your Windows partition and how much space you can afford to give up, since everything you give to the Linux side, you are taking away from Windows. The total size of your hard drive will also come into consideration since with a smaller hard drive you have less room to work with, while with a larger drive you can be generous with the space devoted to Linux since you are less likely to run out.

    I know this is all a bit vague, but each install has to be decided based on what resources you have available and what you plan to use it for. In my case, I had a 250 GB drive in my laptop and I used 50 GB for Linux which left 200 GB for Windows. The 50 GB is less than I would typically use, but since this was just for test purposes, I really didn’t care how much space Linux used since I won’t be using it for much on this computer.

    #81018

    dedeij
    Participant

    With Virtual machines is there a reason you’d prefer dual boot to using something like virtualbox for VMware?

    #81176

    Paul Rouk
    Participant

    Personally, I’m not a big fan of dual boot which is why I hadn’t tried it in several years. The problem with a dual boot system is that you only have access to one operating system (OS) at a time and have to restart your computer every time you want to switch.

    Given the choice (and an extra computer), I always prefer to have one OS on one computer. If that isn’t possible, then running the additional operating system in a virtual machine is a decent second choice, though there may be a slight performance hit depending on your computer.

    #81632

    jamesmmarsh1980
    Participant

    well why I am not using a virtual machine right because I know how to use it. I want to do a dual boot dedeij.
    Paul thank you for your answer.

    #81737

    Peer Aaqib
    Participant

    I have dual boot Windows + Linux , but on starting system I alwayz have to enter ESC then only um able to boot through kali linux, Is there any other option without pressing ESC key, that it should display on my screen which OS I want to boot into

    #81773

    wasim1997
    Participant

    i am using hp pavilion dv6-6110us model …. it does not support kali linux …. give any suggest ?

    #81819

    jamesmmarsh1980
    Participant

    wasim 1997 did you try to search google for that problem first?

    #81850

    Paul Rouk
    Participant

    @peeraaqib — I can’t tell from your description what is happening on your computer. What happens if you don’t press Esc when the computer starts? On my dual boot system, the first thing to come up is a menu which lets me choose between Linux and Windows. It defaults to Linux if I do nothing, or I can use the arrow keys to select Windows.

    #81856

    vipinpatel
    Participant

    You can search in Youtube there are lots of Videos are there regrading dual boot

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 27 total)

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