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This topic contains 11 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  vanthony3 2 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #76040

    ankurj.hazarika
    Participant

    Which answer would you choose?

    During an internal security assessment, external auditors discovered a “back door”. The “back door” finding indicates an issue with-

    a) Data integrity
    b) System stability
    c) System access
    d) System integrity

    #76041

    Eric
    Participant

    C

    #76042

    Nylesunny
    Participant

    D

    #76045

    ankurj.hazarika
    Participant

    @Nylesunny- Why D? Why not C?

    #76081

    Chin_Diesel
    Moderator

    C for sure, though once your access controls are compromised, it can lead to integrity issues, but the plain and simple answer will always be an access problem when you’re talking about back doors.

    #76106

    ankurj.hazarika
    Participant

    This exact logic crossed my mind and I answered C; however, the book says d.

    #76847

    Brian Idol
    Participant

    I would say D. Don’t add information to the questions. It says nothing along the lines of “which allowed unauthorized access”. Because the backdoor exist, that doesn’t mean that your system has been compromised.

    Compare this scenario to your house. You have the front door that is basically a bank vault. You need a physical key, fingerprint, and a PIN to unlock it. Basically impenetrable. You feel that your house is safe from burglars. You walk around the house and find a screen door with no lock on it whatsoever. Because the screen door exists, does that mean that a burglar has been in your house? Of course not. The screen door opens a vulnerability that can allow unauthorized access, but the door itself does not gain access.

    #76900

    ankurj.hazarika
    Participant

    @brian Idol- Understood. But what makes it “D” still. Kindly explain further. How did you infer that the presence of a backdoor merely hampered the integrity?

    #77056

    Brian Idol
    Participant

    The presence of the backdoor does not grant access to anything. It creates a way to bypass authentication, but does not grant permissions to anyone.

    Say you have a fence around your office. There is an entry control point with an armed guard that checks IDs and grants or denies access to the premises based off of your presented ID. In order to access the office, someone must buzz you in since the door is locked. Now lets say that someone cuts a hole in the fence that people can pass through. Since there is a hole in the fence, does that automatically mean that people will start going that way instead of through the entry control point? No of course not. The hole in the fence is the exact same as a backdoor. It can lead to an access control problem, but the hole itself does not grant or deny access. It is simply a means to an end. We can place a guard at the hole and establish another entry control point. The hole still exist, but now we don’t have the access control issue. The hole itself represents a fault in the fence’s integrity.

    #77057

    Brian Idol
    Participant

    I might add that this is why defense in depth or layered defense is so important. Every control that we can put in place has a vulnerability that can be exploited. The fence can be cut, so if that is the only control that we have in place then the attacker gets the keys to the kingdom. So to mitigate that vulnerability, we’ll use other controls such as locked buildings and perimeter checks to ensure that if our outer defense fail we are not totally vulnerable.

    #79454

    kj2015
    Participant

    Answer is D, when we say system integrity it means vulnerabilities those are exploited to establish a backdoor.

    C system access issue – since backdoor doesn’t hinder your access to system nor it can be mitigated by any sort of access mechanism

    #109772

    vanthony3
    Participant

    C

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