Managing Network Connectivity

Practice Labs Module
Time
57 minutes
Difficulty
Intermediate

The "Managing Network Connectivity" module provides you with the instruction and server hardware to develop your hands on skills in the defined topics. This module includes the following exercises: Examine Host Name Resolution Process, Examine Name Resolution Using Alternate DNS Server, Understanding Network Locations.

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Overview

Introduction

The Managing Network Connectivity module provides you with the instruction and server hardware to develop your hands on skills in the defined topics. This module includes the following exercises:

  • Examine Host Name Resolution Process
  • Examine Name Resolution Using Alternate DNS Server
  • Understanding Network Locations

Exercise 1 - Examine Host Name Resolution Process

Computers in a TCP/IP network aside from having a numeric Internet Protocol (IP) address must be given a unique host name. As the number of computers increase in a corporate network, system administrators must install name resolution services that will translate a host name to its numeric IP address or vice-versa. With name resolution services in place, computers will be able to find other servers then connect to their services and ensure network connectivity.

Domain Name System (DNS) which is commonly associated with the Internet is a name resolution service that can help users find other computers in a corporate network. Another example is Windows Internet Name (WINS) which is a legacy name resolution service used on earlier Windows computers.

In this exercise, you will explore different ways of addressing machines by a friendly name rather than an IP address. You will discover what your host name is and attempt to ping your own device and a remote device by host name.

Exercise 2 - Examine Name Resolution Using Alternate DNS Server

System administrators usually install a secondary DNS server that will continue to resolve names on a TCP/IP network to ensure that name resolution services remain uninterrupted in the event the primary DNS server becomes unavailable.

In this exercise, you will configure PLABDM01 to run as secondary DNS server in the PRACTICELABS.COM domain.

Exercise 3 - Understanding Network Locations

Network location is used by Windows to set the appropriate firewall and security settings depending on the type of network your machine connects to.

The type of network locations are:

Home network - computers attached to a home network typically belong to a homegroup-an informal way of organizing your computers to share resources. Home network is trusted because you know the devices that form this network. Network discovery is enabled on Home which allows you to see other devices and allows other users to see your computer.

Work network is a small office network. Network discovery is turned on for this network type and allows you see other devices.

Public network is a network in public places like airports, coffee shops and lounges. This network location type is restrictive because the Windows firewall has default rules enabled to protect your computer from malicious users.

Domain network is a network location used when your Windows workstation is a member of an Active Directory Domain. This network is controlled by a domain administrator where your rights are very limited and your computer network settings can’t be changed.

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