Overview

Introduction

Welcome to the Disk Partitioning Methods and File Systems Practice Lab. In this module you will be provided with the instructions and devices needed to develop your hands-on skills.

Learning Outcomes

In this module, you will complete the following exercises:

  • Exercise 1 - Perform Disk Partitioning
  • Exercise 2 - Work with Different File Systems

After completing this lab, you will be able to:

  • Create a Dynamic Partition
  • Create a Primary Partition
  • Create an Extended and Logical Partition
  • Convert to MBR or GPT Disk
  • Create FAT32 and NTFS File Systems
  • Configure the Network File System (NFS)
  • View the Swap Partition on CentOS
  • View the Swap File in Windows 10

Exam Objectives

The following exam objectives is covered in this lab:

  • 220-1002: 1.4 - Partitioning and file system

Lab Duration

It will take approximately 45 minutes to complete this lab.

Exercise 1 - Perform Disk Partitioning

Disk partitioning is performed to create logically separate compartments inside the hard drive. There are three types of disk partitions: Primary, logical and extended. A hard drive can have a maximum of four primary partitions or three primary and one extended partition. Logical partitions are created on the extended partition. The primary partition with the ACTIVE status is used for booting the system with an operating system. You cannot boot a system from a logical partition as it cannot be made ACTIVE.

Disk partitions are useful from a data security point of view. Formatting and erasing data from one partition does not affect the data stored in another partition. If the hard drive with multiple partitions fails, the data on all partitions is impacted.

In this exercise, you will learn about disk partitioning.

Learning Outcomes

After completing this exercise, you will be able to:

  • Create a Dynamic Partition
  • Create a Primary Partition
  • Create an Extended and Logical Partition
  • Convert to MBR or GPT Disk

Exercise 2 - Work with Different File Systems

ExFAT stands for Extended File Allocation Table. ExFAT is ideal for USB flash drives since it is optimized for external storage devices. ExFAT is lightweight and does not have as many features like NTFS. ExFAT doesn’t have the limitations FAT32 does - the maximum file size limitation is much larger in the ExFAT than in FAT32. All modern versions of the Windows operating system and Mac OS extension support ExFAT.

CDFS stands for Compact Disk File Format. CDFS is present in the Linux and Windows operating systems. In Linux, CDFS is used to transfer tracks and bootable images to the compact disk. In windows, CDFS acts as a driver to CD-ROM players. The job of the driver software is to facilitate the use of a CD-ROM drive. Without CDFS being available, it is not possible to use a CD-ROM drive on the Windows operating system.

Ex3 stand for third extended files system and Ex4 stands for the fourth extended file system. Ex3 and Ex4 are Linux file systems. These files systems are not supported on other platforms, like Windows and Mac OS. The maximum file size in Ex3 file system is between 16 GB and 2TB, and in Ex4, it is 16 TB. The maximum volume size in Ex3 is 2 TB to 32 TB. In Ex4, the maximum volume size is 1EB. The maximum number of files that can be stored using the Ex3 system varies. For Ex4 system, this number is 4 billion.

Learning Outcomes

After completing this exercise, you will be able to:

  • Create FAT32 and NTFS File Systems
  • Configure the Network File System (NFS)
  • View the Swap Partition on CentOS
  • View the Swap File in Windows 10

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