UNM4SK3D: Europol, the FCC, and China

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UNM4SK3D: Europol, the FCC, and China

Published: December 16, 2016 | By: Olivia | Views: 2065
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#cybercriminals

Small victory dance from around the world- an international operation uncovered teens connected to DDoS cyber attacks. 

Who says Generation Z is lazy?! Of the 101 watch-listed and 34 arrested suspects, the majority were under the age of 20. The teens are a part of the illegal ‘DDoS for Hire’ facilities where they paid for cyber attacks of their choosing, consisting of the use of tools such as: stresser and booter services.

What does this operation mean for the rest of us? It draws attention to the need to raise awareness of the risk of young people becoming involved in cyber crime rather than positive online activities, like ethical hacking.

The average cost of an hour-long DDoS attack is only $38 -a study by Incapsula

Wonder if the teens used money to pay for the attacks they made baby sitting or mowing the lawn? At any rate, see how one industry further ties youth to cyber crime in ‘Cybercrime and the Gaming Industry.’

#netneutrality

It’s been confirmed that Democratic FCC Commissioner, Jessica Rosenworcel is out- leaving room for the appointment of a potential, new Republican commissioner who objects net neutrality.

Eminem wasn’t kidding when he famously rapped “The FCC won’t let me be,” because the FCC regulates wireless carriers, cable, radio and television broadcast, and the internet infrastructure. Unfortunately for us, that means with the removal of net neutrality rules, internet providers could start charging our favorite sites, like Netflix, a fee to access end-users at faster speeds. In turn, forcing those sites to either charge us more for their services or forcing us to just accept poor service.

Is there a bright side in this? Reversing Obama’s net neutrality rules is going to take time. Plus, President-elect Trump has not yet chosen his nominee, giving you the chance to finish binge-watching Game of Thrones.

99 percent of the 1.1 million comments on “Net neutrality” submitted to the Federal Communications Commission are in favor of it -The Sunlight Foundation

For more on what the FCC’s been up to, checkout this 0P3N post, ‘FCC Rules May Prevent Installing Alternative Software.’

#antihackingaccord

There’s a new cyber security rule in China that has the US giving side- eye, and revisiting last year’s anti-hacking accord, in which both countries agreed they would not partake in hacking for commercial advantages.

Flashback to last year, Chinese President Xi Jinping’s visit to Washington and the newly signed cyber security guidelines, part of which agreed to regular meetings on cyber security issues and concerns. Looks like now the US has concerns; those being that China’s newest rule, mandating technology suppliers to divulge their source code decreases security, by a lot. Now our friends in the Silicon Valley are protesting.

They said, we said? Chinese officials say “giving up source code is the only way to prove hackers cannot compromise a companies’ products and confirmation that the products do not contain back doors.” Those in agreement say it aims at combating hackers and terrorism. While critics, according to reuters.com say, “it threatens to shut foreign technology companies out of various sectors deemed ‘critical’ and includes contentious requirements for security reviews and for data to be stored on servers in China.”

On top of the ‘Motivations Behind Attacks’ chart, Cyber Espionage ranks at number three with 7.4%, while attacks motivated by Cyber Warfare counted for a modest 4.3% of total -hackmageddon.com

While you’re waiting to see how this turns out, read  ‘A Comprehensive Look at Counter terrorism, Hacktivism, and Cyber Espionage.’

#skillcertspotlight

We understand the pain points of studying for the CISSP exam, so we wanted to make it easier for you.

The CISSP is critical for those working in a variety of cyber security roles, from Security Systems Engineers, to Network Architects. It helps to prove a mastery of technical and managerial skills, giving one the ability to oversee an overall information security program. But let’s face it, with the 8 domains of knowledge tested on, it’s downright hard to pass. Don’t let that discourage you though, Cybrary is here to help!

As of November, there are 72,685 active CISSPs in the United States alone -(ISC)2

If you want to hone your skills in one specific domain, or use the skill certification tests as practice for the full length exam, the domains are now offered in digestible chunks from the skills certification courses and corresponding tests. We recommend trying out: Security Operations, Security Engineering, or Asset Security.

oliviaOlivia Lynch is the Marketing Manager at Cybrary. Like many of you, she is just getting her toes wet in the field of cyber security. A firm believer that the pen is mightier than the sword, Olivia considers corny puns and an honest voice essential to any worthwhile blog.

Now Reading The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing: Violate Them at Your Own Risk! By Al Ries & Jack Trout

 

 

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